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Endogenous Exposure to Systemic Liquidity Risk

Author

Listed:
  • Jin Cao

    (Norges Bank)

  • Gerhard Illing

    (Department of Economics, University of Munich and CESifo)

Abstract

Traditionally, aggregate liquidity shocks are modeled as exogenous events. This paper analyzes the adequate policy response to endogenous exposure to systemic liquidity risk. We analyze the feedback between lender-of-last-resort policy and incentives of private banks, determining the aggregate amount of liquidity available. We show that imposing minimum liquidity standards for banks ex ante is a crucial requirement for sensible lender-of-last-resort policy. In addition, we analyze the impact of equity requirements and narrow banking, in the sense that banks are required to hold sufficient liquid funds so as to pay out in all contingencies. We show that both policies are strictly inferior to imposing minimum liquidity standards ex ante combined with lender-of-last-resort policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Jin Cao & Gerhard Illing, 2011. "Endogenous Exposure to Systemic Liquidity Risk," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(2), pages 173-216, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijc:ijcjou:y:2011:q:2:a:6
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Carlson, 2015. "Lessons from the Historical Use of Reserve Requirements in the United States to Promote Bank Liquidity," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(1), pages 191-224, January.
    2. Jin Cao & Gerhard Illing, 2015. "Money in the equilibrium of banking," Working Paper 2015/22, Norges Bank.
    3. Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena & Gale, Douglas, 2014. "Money, financial stability and efficiency," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 100-127.
    4. Diana Bonfim & Moshe Kim, 2012. "Systemic Liquidity Risk," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    5. Khemais Zaghdoudi & Abdelaziz Hakimi, 2017. "The Determinants of Liquidity Risk: Evidence from Tunisian Banks," Journal of Applied Finance & Banking, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(2), pages 1-5.
    6. Aleksandra Maslowska-Jokinen & Anna MatysekJedrych, 2016. "Post-Crisis Regulatory and Supervisory Arrangements – The New ‘Old’ Central Banking," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1632, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    7. Diana Bonfim & Moshe Kim, 2012. "Liquidity risk in banking: is there herding?," Working Papers w201218, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    8. Douglas Gale, 2015. "Regulation and Sausages," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83, pages 1-26, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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