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Lending Standards over the Credit Cycle

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  • Giacomo Rodano
  • Nicolas Serrano-Velarde
  • Emanuele Tarantino

Abstract

We analyze how firms’ segmentation into credit classes affects the lending standards applied by banks to small and medium enterprises over the cycle. We exploit an institutional feature of the Italian credit market that generates a discontinuity in the allocation of comparable firms into the performing and substandard classes of credit risk. In the boom period, segmentation results in a positive interest rate spread between substandard and performing firms. In the bust period, the increase in banks’ cost of wholesale funds implies that substandard firms are excluded from credit. These firms then report lower values of production and capital investments. Received January 22, 2016; editorial decision December 18, 2017 by Editor Robin Greenwood. Authors have furnished an Internet Appendix, which is available on the Oxford University Press Web site next to the link to the final published paper online.

Suggested Citation

  • Giacomo Rodano & Nicolas Serrano-Velarde & Emanuele Tarantino, 2018. "Lending Standards over the Credit Cycle," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 31(8), pages 2943-2982.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:31:y:2018:i:8:p:2943-2982.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregory S. Crawford & Nicola Pavanini & Fabiano Schivardi, 2018. "Asymmetric Information and Imperfect Competition in Lending Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(7), pages 1659-1701, July.
    2. Gete, Pedro, 2018. "Lending standards and macroeconomic dynamics," Working Paper Series 2207, European Central Bank.
    3. Carletti, Elena & De Marco, Filippo & Ioannidou, Vasso & Sette, Enrico, 2019. "Banks as Patient Lenders: Evidence from a Tax Reform," CEPR Discussion Papers 13722, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Enrico Sette, 2017. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Working Papers 964, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    5. Xin Zhang & Christoph Bertsch & Isaiah Hull, 2017. "Monetary Normalizations and Consumer Credit: Evidence from Fed Liftoff and Online Lending," 2017 Meeting Papers 442, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Juan S. Mora-Sanguinetti & Marta Martínez-Matute & Miguel García-Posada, 2017. "Credit, crisis and contract enforcement: evidence from the Spanish loan market," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 361-383, October.
    7. repec:bla:econom:v:86:y:2019:i:341:p:1-31 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Philippe Aghion & Antonin Bergeaud & Gilbert Cette & Rémy Lecat & Hélène Maghin, 2019. "Coase Lecture ‐ The Inverted‐U Relationship Between Credit Access and Productivity Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 86(341), pages 1-31, January.
    9. Bertsch, Christoph & Hull, Isaiah & Zhang, Xin, 2016. "Fed Liftoff and Subprime Loan Interest Rates: Evidence from the Peer-to-Peer Lending Market," Working Paper Series 319, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    10. Giuseppe Ferrero & Andrea Nobili & Gabriele Sene, 2019. "Credit risk-taking and maturity mismatch: the role of the yield curve," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1220, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    11. Gabriel Jiménez & Enrique Moral-Benito & Raquel Vegas, 2018. "Bank lending standards over the cycle: the role of firms’ productivity and credit risk," Working Papers 1811, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    12. Roberto Blanco & Noelia Jiménez, 2018. "Credit allocation along the business cycle: evidence from the latest boom bust credit cycle in Spain," Working Papers 1826, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    13. Lorenzo Burlon & Davide Fantino & Andrea Nobili & Gabriele Sene, 2016. "The quantity of corporate credit rationing with matched bank-firm data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1058, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

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    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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