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Financial Cycles with Heterogeneous Intermediaries

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  • Nuno Coimbra
  • Hélène Rey

Abstract

This paper develops a dynamic macroeconomic model with heterogeneous financial intermediaries and endogenous entry. It features time-varying endogenous macroeconomic risk that arises from the risk-shifting behaviour of financial intermediaries combined with entry and exit. We show that when interest rates are high, a decrease in interest rates stimulates investment and increases financial stability. In contrast, when interest rates are low, further stimulus can increase systemic risk and induce a fall in the risk premium through increased risk-shifting. In this case, the monetary authority faces a trade-off between stimulating the economy and financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Nuno Coimbra & Hélène Rey, 2017. "Financial Cycles with Heterogeneous Intermediaries," NBER Working Papers 23245, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23245
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Galo Nuño & Carlos Thomas, 2017. "Bank Leverage Cycles," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 32-72, April.
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    7. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
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    9. Silvia Miranda-Agrippino & Hélène Rey, 2015. "US Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Cycle," NBER Working Papers 21722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Marc J. Melitz, 2003. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1695-1725, November.
    11. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José‐Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2014. "Hazardous Times for Monetary Policy: What Do Twenty‐Three Million Bank Loans Say About the Effects of Monetary Policy on Credit Risk‐Taking?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(2), pages 463-505, March.
    12. Morais,Bernardo & Peydró,José-Luis & Ruiz Ortega,Claudia, 2015. "The international bank lending channel of monetary policy rates and quantitative easing : credit supply, reach-for-yield, and real effects," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7216, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. R. S.J. Koijen & F. Koulischer & B. Nguyen & M. Yogo, 2016. "Quantitative Easing in the Euro Area: The Dynamics of Risk Exposures and the Impact on Asset Prices," Working papers 601, Banque de France.
    2. Marcus Miller & Lei Zhang & Songklod Rastapana, 2017. "Subprime assets and financial crisis: theory, policy and the law," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 340, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. repec:oup:jeurec:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:721-745. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ralph S.J. Koijen & Motohiro Yogo, 2015. "A Demand System Approach to Asset Pricing," NBER Working Papers 21749, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mircea Epure & Irina Mihai & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró, 2017. "Household Credit, Global Financial Cycle, and Macroprudential Policies: Credit Register Evidence from an Emerging Country," Working Papers 1006, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    6. Monica Billio & Anna Petronevich, 2017. "Dynamical Interaction Between Financial and Business Cycles," Working Papers 2017:24, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    7. Bua, Giovanna & Dunne, Peter G., 2017. "The Portfolio Rebalancing Effects of the ECB's Asset Purchase Programme," Research Technical Papers 07/RT/17, Central Bank of Ireland.
    8. Divya Kirti, 2017. "When Gambling for Resurrection is Too Risky," IMF Working Papers 17/180, International Monetary Fund.
    9. José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Enrico Sette, 2017. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Working Papers 964, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    10. Elena Gerko & Hélène Rey, 2017. "Monetary Policy in the Capitals of Capital," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 721-745.
    11. Amat Adarov, 2017. "Financial Cycles in Credit, Housing and Capital Markets: Evidence from Systemic Economies," wiiw Working Papers 140, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    12. Amat Adarov, 2018. "Financial Cycles Around the World," wiiw Working Papers 145, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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