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US Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Cycle

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  • Silvia Miranda-Agrippino
  • Hélène Rey

Abstract

We analyze the workings of the “Global Financial Cycle.” We study the effects of monetary policy of the United States, the center country of the international monetary system, on the joint dynamics of the domestic business cycle and international financial variables such as global credit growth, cross-border credit flows, global banks leverage and risky asset prices. One global factor, driven in part by US monetary policy, explains an important share of the variance of returns of risky assets around the world. We find evidence of large financial spillovers from the hegemon to the rest of the world.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Miranda-Agrippino & Hélène Rey, 2015. "US Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Cycle," NBER Working Papers 21722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21722
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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