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Rounding the Corners of the Policy Trilemma: Sources of monetary policy autonomy

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  • Jay C. Shambaugh
  • Michael W. Klein

Abstract

A central result in international macroeconomics is that a government cannot simultaneously opt for open financial markets, fixed exchange rates, and monetary autonomy; rather, it is constrained to choosing no more than two of these three. This paper considers whether partial capital controls and limited exchange rate flexibility allow for full monetary policy autonomy. We find partial capital controls do not generally allow for greater monetary control than with open capital accounts, unless they are quite extensive, but a moderate amount of exchange rate flexibility does allow for some degree of monetary autonomy, especially in emerging and developing economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Jay C. Shambaugh & Michael W. Klein, 2015. "Rounding the Corners of the Policy Trilemma: Sources of monetary policy autonomy," Working Papers 2015-4, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2015-4
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    exchange rate regimes; trilemma; monetary policy; capital controls;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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