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Competition and the pass-through of unconventional monetary policy: evidence from TLTROs

Author

Listed:
  • Matteo Benetton

    () (Berkeley)

  • Davide Fantino

    () (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

We make use of an allocation rule by the ECB for Targeted Longer-Term Refinancing Operations (TLTROs) to provide causal evidence on the effect of unconventional monetary policy on the cost of loans to firms. Using transaction-level data from Italy’s Central Credit Register and a difference-in-difference identification strategy, we show that treated banks decrease loan rates to the same firm by approximately 20 basis points compared with control banks. We then study how the effects of the liquidity injection vary according to the competition in the banking sector, exploiting the local nature of bank-firm lending relationships and exogenous variations in the number of pawnshops across Italian cities during the Renaissance. Our results suggest that banks' market power can significantly impair the effectiveness of unconventional monetary policy, especially for safer and smaller firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Matteo Benetton & Davide Fantino, 2018. "Competition and the pass-through of unconventional monetary policy: evidence from TLTROs," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1187, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_1187_18
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Margherita Bottero & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Andrea F. Presbitero & Enrico Sette, 2019. "Negative Monetary Policy Rates and Portfolio Rebalancing: Evidence from Credit Register Data," Working Papers 1090, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Joost Bats & Tom Hudepohl, 2019. "Impact of targeted credit easing by the ECB: Bank-level evidence," DNB Working Papers 631, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Desislava C. Andreeva & Miguel García-Posada, 2019. "The impact of the ECB’s targeted long-term refinancing operations on banks’ lending policies: the role of competition," Working Papers 1903, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    4. Laine, Olli-Matti, 2019. "The effect of TLTRO-II on bank lending," Research Discussion Papers 7/2019, Bank of Finland.
    5. António Afonso & Joana Sousa-Leite, 2019. "The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to bank credit supply: evidence from the TLTRO," Working Papers w201901, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unconventional monetary policy; bank competition; pass-through.;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms

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