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The Deposits Channel of Monetary Policy

Author

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  • Itamar Drechsler
  • Alexi Savov
  • Philipp Schnabl

Abstract

We present a new channel for the transmission of monetary policy, the deposits channel. We show that when the Fed funds rate rises, banks widen the spreads they charge on deposits, and deposits flow out of the banking system. We present a model where this is due to market power in deposit markets. Consistent with the market power mechanism, deposit spreads increase more and deposits flow out more in concentrated markets. This is true even when we control for lending opportunities by only comparing different branches of the same bank. Since deposits are the main source of liquid assets for households, the deposits channel can explain the observed strong relationship between the liquidity premium and the Fed funds rate. Since deposits are also a uniquely stable funding source for banks, the deposits channel impacts bank lending. When the Fed funds rate rises, banks that raise deposits in concentrated markets contract their lending by more than other banks. Our estimates imply that the deposits channel can account for the entire transmission of monetary policy through bank balance sheets.

Suggested Citation

  • Itamar Drechsler & Alexi Savov & Philipp Schnabl, 2017. "The Deposits Channel of Monetary Policy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 1819-1876.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:132:y:2017:i:4:p:1819-1876.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/qje/qjx019
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kuk:journl:v:50:y:2017:i:3:p:363-392 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mark Egan & Stefan Lewellen & Adi Sunderam, 2017. "The Cross Section of Bank Value," NBER Working Papers 23291, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ramona Busch & Christoph Memmel, 2017. "Banks’ Net Interest Margin and the Level of Interest Rates," Credit and Capital Markets, Credit and Capital Markets, vol. 50(3), pages 363-392.
    4. Matteo Benetton, 2017. "Lenders' Competition and Macro-prudential Regulation: A Model of the UK Mortgage Supermarket," 2017 Meeting Papers 1001, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Carlo Altavilla & Fabio Canova & Matteo Ciccarelli, 2016. "Mending the broken link: heterogeneous bank lending and monetary policy pass-through," Working Papers No 9/2016, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    6. Paula Bustos & Gabriel Garber & Jacopo Ponticelli, 2016. "Capital Allocation Across Sectors: Evidence from a Boom in Agriculture," Working Papers Series 414, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    7. Bratsiotis, George J., 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits Channel," EconStor Preprints 172770, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    8. Sotirios Kokas & Dmitri Vinogradov & Marios Zachariadis, 2018. "Which Banks Smooth and at What Price?," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 01-2018, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    9. Robin Döttling, 2018. "Bank Capital Regulation in a Zero Interest Environment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 18-016/IV, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Phil Molyneux & Rue Xie & John Thornton & Alessio Reghezza, 2017. "Did Negative Interest Rates Impact Bank Lending?," Working Papers 17002, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    11. Choi, Dong Boem & Choi, Hyun-Soo, 2016. "The effect of monetary policy on bank wholesale funding," Staff Reports 759, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Apr 2017.
    12. Jeremy C. Stein & Adi Sunderam, 2015. "Gradualism in Monetary Policy: A Time-Consistency Problem?," NBER Working Papers 21569, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. George J. Bratsiotis, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 236, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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