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A Macroeconomic Model with a Financial Sector

  • Yuliy Sannikov
  • Markus K. Brunnermeier

    (Princeton University)

This paper studies a macroeconomic model in which financial experts borrow from less productive agents in order to invest in financial assets. We pursue three set of results: (i) Going beyond a steady state analysis, we show that adverse shocks cause amplifying price declines not only through the erosion of net worth of the financial sector, but also through increased price volatility, leading to precautionary hoarding and fire sales. (ii) Financial sector’s leverage and maturity mismatch is excessive, since it does not internalize externalities it imposes on the labor sector and other financial experts due to a fire-sale externality. (iii) Securitization, which allows the financial sector to offload some risk, exacerbates the excessive risk-taking.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 1114.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1114
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Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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  1. Yuliy Sannikov, 2008. "A Continuous-Time Version of the Principal-Agent Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(3), pages 957-984.
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  15. Robert M. Townsend, 1979. "Optimal contracts and competitive markets with costly state verification," Staff Report 45, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  16. Diamond, Douglas W & Dybvig, Philip H, 1983. "Bank Runs, Deposit Insurance, and Liquidity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(3), pages 401-19, June.
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  18. Bolton, Patrick & Scharfstein, David S, 1990. "A Theory of Predation Based on Agency Problems in Financial Contracting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(1), pages 93-106, March.
  19. Lars Ljungqvist & Thomas J. Sargent, 2004. "Recursive Macroeconomic Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 026212274x, March.
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