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Sovereign Default Risk and Banks in a Monetary Union

  • Harald Uhlig

This paper seeks to understand the interplay between banks, bank regulation, sovereign default risk and central bank guarantees in a monetary union. I assume that banks can use sovereign bonds for repurchase agreements with a common central bank, and that their sovereign partially backs up any losses, should the banks not be able to repurchase the bonds. I argue that regulators in risky countries have an incentive to allow their banks to hold home risky bonds and risk defaults, while regulators in other "safe" countries will impose tighter regulation. As a result, governments in risky countries get to borrow more cheaply, effectively shifting the risk of some of the potential sovereign default losses on the common central bank.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w19343.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19343.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19343
Note: AP EFG IFM ME POL
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  1. Reinhart, Carmen M., 2012. "A Series of Unfortunate Events: Common Sequencing Patterns in Financial Crises," CEPR Discussion Papers 8742, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Fernando Broner & Aitor Erce & Alberto Martín & Jaume Ventura, 2013. "Sovereign Debt Markets in Turbulent Times: Creditor Discrimination and Crowding-Out Effects," Working Papers 701, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  3. Reinhart, C. M., 2012. "The return of financial repression," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 16, pages 37-48, April.
  4. Acharya, Viral V & Steffen, Sascha, 2013. "The "Greatest" Carry Trade Ever? Understanding Eurozone Bank Risks," CEPR Discussion Papers 9432, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Viral V. Acharya & Sascha Steffen, 2013. "The "Greatest" Carry Trade Ever? Understanding Eurozone Bank Risks," NBER Working Papers 19039, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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