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Repatriation of Debt in the Euro Crisis: Evidence for the Secondary Market Theory

  • Filippo Brutti
  • Philip Ulrich Sauré

The Euro Crisis has stopped the process of the European financial integration and triggered a strong repatriation of debt from foreign to domestic investors. We investigate this empirical pattern in light of competing theories of cross-border portfolio allocation. Three empirical regularities stand out: i) repatriation of debt occurred mainly in crisis countries; ii) repatriation affected mainly public debt; iii) public debt of crisis countries was reallocated to politically influential countries within the Euro Area. Standard theories are in line with pattern (i) at best. We argue that the full picture constitutes evidence for the "secondary market theory" of sovereign debt.

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Paper provided by Swiss National Bank in its series Working Papers with number 2014-03.

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Length: 54 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:snb:snbwpa:2014-03
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  30. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/c8dmi8nm4pdjkuc9g7084aa4m is not listed on IDEAS
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