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Sovereign Risk and Bank Lending: Evidence from 1999 Turkish Earthquake

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  • Yusuf Soner Baskaya
  • Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan

Abstract

We investigate the effect of sovereign risk on credit supply, using August 1999 Earthquake as an exogenous shock leading to an increase in Turkey's default risk. Using data on universe of banks between 1997-2012, we show that, banks with higher ex-ante exposures to government bonds suffered a bigger shock to their networth and decreased lending more ex-post. Tracing the impact of an exogenous increase in the sovereign spread to credit supply, the average bank decreases its credit supply by 1.6 percentage points which corresponds to 55 percent of the actual decline in aggregate loan provision in the aftermath of the shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Yusuf Soner Baskaya & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 2016. "Sovereign Risk and Bank Lending: Evidence from 1999 Turkish Earthquake," NBER Working Papers 22335, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22335
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Farhi, Emmanuel & Tirole, Jean, 2015. "Deadly Embrace: Sovereign and Financial Balance Sheets Doom Loops," CEPR Discussion Papers 11024, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    4. Alexander Popov & Neeltje Van Horen, 2015. "Exporting Sovereign Stress: Evidence from Syndicated Bank Lending during the Euro Area Sovereign Debt Crisis," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(5), pages 1825-1866.
    5. Viral Acharya & Itamar Drechsler & Philipp Schnabl, 2014. "A Pyrrhic Victory? Bank Bailouts and Sovereign Credit Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2689-2739, December.
    6. Buch, Claudia M. & Koetter, Michael & Ohls, Jana, 2016. "Banks and sovereign risk: A granular view," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 1-15.
    7. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    8. repec:oup:restud:v:85:y:2018:i:3:p:1781-1823. is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Filippo De Marco, 2017. "Bank Lending and the European Sovereign Debt Crisis," Working Papers 213, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    10. Filippo Brutti & Philip Ulrich Sauré, 2014. "Repatriation of Debt in the Euro Crisis: Evidence for the Secondary Market Theory," Working Papers 2014-03, Swiss National Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Baskaya, Yusuf Soner & di Giovanni, Julian & Kalemli-Özcan, Şebnem & Peydro, José-Luis & Ulu, Mehmet Fatih, 2017. "Capital flows and the international credit channel," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(S1), pages 15-22.
    2. Nicola Gennaioli & Alberto Martin & Stefano Rossi, 2013. "Government default, bonds, and bank lending around the world: What do the data say?," Economics Working Papers 1378, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2015.
    3. Arellano, Cristina & Bai, Yan & Bocola, Luigi, 2017. "Sovereign risk and firm heterogeneity," Staff Report 547, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. Tomas Williams, 2017. "Capital Inflows, Sovereign Debt and Bank Lending: Micro-Evidence from an Emerging Market," Working Papers 2017-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    5. Yusuf Soner Baskaya & Julian di Giovanni & Sebnem Kalemli-Özcan & Mehmet Fatih Ulu, 2017. "International spillovers and local credit cycles," Economics Working Papers 1559, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Aug 2017.
    6. Cristina Arellano & Yan Bai & Luigi Bocola, 2017. "Sovereign Default Risk and Firm Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 23314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gennaioli, Nicola & Martin, Alberto & Rossi, Stefano, 2014. "Banks, Government Bonds, and Default: What do the Data Say?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10044, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Michael Chui & Emese Kuruc & Philip Turner, 2016. "A new dimension to currency mismatches in the emerging markets - non-financial companies," BIS Working Papers 550, Bank for International Settlements.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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