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Whatever it takes: The real effects of unconventional monetary policy

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  • Acharya, Viral
  • Eisert, Tim
  • Eufinger, Christian
  • Hirsch, Christian

Abstract

Launched in Summer 2012, the European Central Bank (ECB)'s Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) program indirectly recapitalized European banks through its positive impact on periphery sovereign bonds. However, the stability reestablished in the banking sector did not fully translate into economic growth. We document zombie lending by banks that remained undercapitalized even post-OMT. In turn, firms receiving loans used these funds not to undertake real economic activity such as employment and investment but to build up cash reserves. Creditworthy firms in industries with a high zombie firm prevalence suffered significantly from this credit misallocation, which further slowed down the economic recovery.

Suggested Citation

  • Acharya, Viral & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2017. "Whatever it takes: The real effects of unconventional monetary policy," SAFE Working Paper Series 152, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:safewp:152
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    Keywords

    Unconventional Monetary Policy; Real Effects; Zombie Lending;
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