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Whatever it takes: The real effects of unconventional monetary policy

Author

Listed:
  • Acharya, Viral
  • Eisert, Tim
  • Eufinger, Christian
  • Hirsch, Christian

Abstract

Launched in Summer 2012, the European Central Bank (ECB)'s Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) program indirectly recapitalized European banks through its positive impact on periphery sovereign bonds. However, the stability reestablished in the banking sector did not fully translate into economic growth. We document zombie lending by banks that remained undercapitalized even post-OMT. In turn, firms receiving loans used these funds not to undertake real economic activity such as employment and investment but to build up cash reserves. Creditworthy firms in industries with a high zombie firm prevalence suffered significantly from this credit misallocation, which further slowed down the economic recovery.

Suggested Citation

  • Acharya, Viral & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2017. "Whatever it takes: The real effects of unconventional monetary policy," SAFE Working Paper Series 152, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:safewp:152
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gropp, Reint & Mosk, Thomas & Ongena, Steven & Wix, Carlo, 2016. "Bank response to higher capital requirements: Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment," SAFE Working Paper Series 156, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Mariassunta Giannetti & Andrei Simonov, 2013. "On the Real Effects of Bank Bailouts: Micro Evidence from Japan," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 135-167, January.
    3. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 2005. "Unnatural Selection: Perverse Incentives and the Misallocation of Credit in Japan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1144-1166, September.
    4. Michele Lenza, 2015. "The financial and macroeconomic effects of OMT announcements," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 22, pages 12-16.
    5. Amir Sufi, 2007. "Information Asymmetry and Financing Arrangements: Evidence from Syndicated Loans," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(2), pages 629-668, April.
    6. Carlo Altavilla & Domenico Giannone & Michele Lenza, 2016. "The Financial and Macroeconomic Effects of the OMT Announcements," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(3), pages 29-57, September.
    7. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    8. Veronesi, Pietro & Zingales, Luigi, 2010. "Paulson's gift," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 339-368, September.
    9. Gabriel Chodorow-Reich, 2014. "The Employment Effects of Credit Market Disruptions: Firm-level Evidence from the 2008-9 Financial Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(1), pages 1-59.
    10. Urszula Szczerbowicz, 2015. "The ECB Unconventional Monetary Policies: Have They Lowered Market Borrowing Costs for Banks and Governments?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(4), pages 91-127, December.
    11. Diamond, Douglas W, 1991. "Monitoring and Reputation: The Choice between Bank Loans and Directly Placed Debt," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 689-721, August.
    12. Acharya, Viral V & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2014. "Real Effects of the Sovereign Debt Crisis in Europe: Evidence from Syndicated Loans," CEPR Discussion Papers 10108, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Ferrando, Annalisa & Popov, Alexander & Udell, Gregory F., 2015. "Sovereign stress, unconventional monetary policy, and SME access to finance," Working Paper Series 1820, European Central Bank.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Treasury's Missed Opportunity
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2017-06-19 18:01:13

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marko Petrovic & Andrea Teglio & Simone Alfarano, 2016. "The role of bank credit allocation: Evidence from the Spanish economy," Working Papers 2016/17, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    2. Sven Steinkamp & Aaron Tornell & Frank Westermann, 2017. "The Euro Area's Common Pool Problem Revisited: Has the Single Supervisory Mechanism Ameliorated Forbearance and Evergreening," CESifo Working Paper Series 6670, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Carlo Altavilla & Fabio Canova & Matteo Ciccarelli, 2016. "Mending the broken link: heterogeneous bank lending and monetary policy pass-through," Working Papers No 9/2016, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    4. Fabiano Schivardi & Enrico Sette & Guido Tabellini, 2017. "Credit misallocation during the European financial crisis," BIS Working Papers 669, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Dan Andrews & Filippos Petroulakis, 2017. "Breaking the Shackles: Zombie Firms, Weak Banks and Depressed Restructuring in Europe," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1433, OECD Publishing.
    6. Storz, Manuela & Koetter, Michael & Setzer, Ralph & Westphal, Andreas, 2017. "Do we want these two to tango? On zombie firms and stressed banks in Europe," Working Paper Series 2104, European Central Bank.
    7. GOTO Yasuo & Scott WILBUR, 2017. "Efficiency among Japanese SMEs: In the context of the zombie firm hypothesis and firm size," Discussion papers 17123, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Óscar Arce & Ricardo Gimeno & Sergio Mayordomo, 2017. "Making room for the needy: the credit-reallocation effects of the ECB’s corporate QE," Working Papers 1743, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    9. repec:eee:jebusi:v:95:y:2018:i:c:p:26-46 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Martien Lamers & Frederik Mergaerts & Elien Meuleman & Rudi Vander Vennet, 2016. "The trade-off between monetary policy and bank stability," Working Paper Research 308, National Bank of Belgium.
    11. Laura Blattner & Luisa Farinha & Francisca Rebelo, 2017. "When Losses Turn Into Loans: The Cost of Undercapitalized Banks," 2017 Papers pbl215, Job Market Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unconventional Monetary Policy; Real Effects; Zombie Lending;

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