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Mind the gap: The difference between U.S. and European loan rates

Author

Listed:
  • Berg, Tobias
  • Saunders, Anthony
  • Steffen, Sascha
  • Streitz, Daniel

Abstract

We analyze differences in the pricing of syndicated loans between U.S. and European loans. For credit lines, U.S. borrowers pay significantly higher spreads, but also lower fees, resulting in similar total costs of borrowing in both markets. For term loans, U.S. firms pay significantly higher spreads. While European firms across the rating spectrum issue terms loans, only low quality U.S. firms rely on term loans. U.S. issuers perform worse after loan origination compared to European issuers, which explains 30% of the spread differential. Increasing loan supply by institutional lenders in the U.S. since 2003 eventually fully removed the term loan pricing gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Berg, Tobias & Saunders, Anthony & Steffen, Sascha & Streitz, Daniel, 2016. "Mind the gap: The difference between U.S. and European loan rates," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-018, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:16018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Acharya, Viral V & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2017. "Whatever it takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 12005, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Burietz, Aurore & Oosterlinck, Kim & Szafarz, Ariane, 2017. "Europe vs. the U.S.: A new look at the syndicated loan pricing puzzle," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 50-53.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    loans; corporate debt; fees; market integration; globalization;

    JEL classification:

    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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