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Liquidity risk and syndicate structure

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  • Gatev, Evan
  • Strahan, Philip E.

Abstract

We decompose syndicated loan risk into credit, market, and liquidity risk and test how these shape syndicate structure. Commercial banks dominate relative to non-banks in loan syndicates that expose lenders to liquidity risk. This dominance is most pronounced when borrowers have high levels of credit or market risk. We then tie commercial banks' advantage in liquidity risk to access to transactions deposits by comparing investments across banks. The results suggest that risk-management considerations matter most for participants relative to lead arrangers. Links from transactions deposits to liquidity exposure, for instance, are more than 50% larger at participants than at lead arrangers.

Suggested Citation

  • Gatev, Evan & Strahan, Philip E., 2009. "Liquidity risk and syndicate structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(3), pages 490-504, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:93:y:2009:i:3:p:490-504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ross Levine & Chen Lin & Zigan Wang & Wensi Xie, 2018. "Bank Liquidity, Credit Supply, and the Environment," NBER Working Papers 24375, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Tobias Berg & Daniel Streitz & Michael Wedow, 2015. "Real Effects of Securitization," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1514, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    3. repec:fip:fedgfe:2014-115 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ross Levine & Chen Lin & Zigan Wang & Wensi Xie, 2018. "Bank Liquidity, Credit Supply, and the Environment," Working Papers id:12565, eSocialSciences.
    5. repec:eee:ecolet:v:161:y:2017:i:c:p:10-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Paulo Bastos & Nicolas L. Bottan & Julian Cristia, 2017. "Access to Preprimary Education and Progression in Primary School: Evidence from Rural Guatemala," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, pages 521-547.
    7. Godlewski, Christophe J., 2014. "Bank loans and borrower value during the global financial crisis: Empirical evidence from France," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 100-130.
    8. Felipe Restrepo & Lina Cardona Sosa & Philip E. Strahan, 2017. "Funding Liquidity without Banks: Evidence from a Shock to the Cost of Very Short-Term Debt," NBER Working Papers 23179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Irani, Rustom M. & Meisenzahl, Ralf R., 2015. "Loan Sales and Bank Liquidity Risk Management: Evidence from a U.S. Credit Register," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-1, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Caballero, Julian, 2015. "Banking crises and financial integration: Insights from networks science," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 127-146.
    11. Chaudhry, Sajid M. & Kleimeier, Stefanie, 2015. "Lead arranger reputation and the structure of loan syndicates," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 116-126.
    12. Goenner, Cullen F, 2016. "The policy impact of new rules for loan participation on credit union returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 198-210.
    13. Hollander, Stephan & Verriest, Arnt, 2016. "Bridging the gap: the design of bank loan contracts and distance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 399-419.
    14. Berg, Tobias & Saunders, Anthony & Steffen, Sascha & Streitz, Daniel, 2016. "Mind the gap: The difference between U.S. and European loan rates," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-018, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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