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Stress tests and information disclosure

Author

Listed:
  • Goldstein, Itay

    (The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania)

  • Leitner, Yaron

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

Abstract

Supersedes Working Paper 13-26 . We study an optimal disclosure policy of a regulator that has information about banks’ ability to overcome future liquidity shocks. We focus on the following tradeoff: Disclosing some information may be necessary to prevent a market breakdown, but disclosing too much information destroys risk-sharing opportunities (the Hirshleifer effect). We find that during normal times, no disclosure is optimal, but during bad times, partial disclosure is optimal. We characterize the optimal form of this partial disclosure. We relate our results to the Bayesian persuasion literature and to the debate on disclosure of stress test results.

Suggested Citation

  • Goldstein, Itay & Leitner, Yaron, 2015. "Stress tests and information disclosure," Working Papers 15-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 16 Nov 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:15-10
    Note: Superseded by WP 17-28
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Joseba Martinez & Thomas Philippon, 2017. "Runs versus Lemons: Information Disclosure and Fiscal Capacity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1683-1707.
    2. Emir Kamenica & Matthew Gentzkow, 2011. "Bayesian Persuasion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2590-2615, October.
    3. Grossman, Sanford J, 1981. "The Informational Role of Warranties and Private Disclosure about Product Quality," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 461-483, December.
    4. Innes, Robert D., 1990. "Limited liability and incentive contracting with ex-ante action choices," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 45-67, October.
    5. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1971. "The Private and Social Value of Information and the Reward to Inventive Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 561-574, September.
    6. Gick, Wolfgang & Pausch, Thilo, 2013. "Bayesian Persuasion By Stress Test Disclosure," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79913, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. José M. Marín & Rohit Rahi, 2000. "Information Revelation and Market Incompleteness," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 563-579.
    8. Mike Burkart & Denis Gromb & Fausto Panunzi, 1997. "Large Shareholders, Monitoring, and the Value of the Firm," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 693-728.
    9. Yaron Leitner, 2005. "Financial Networks: Contagion, Commitment, and Private Sector Bailouts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(6), pages 2925-2953, December.
    10. Michael Ostrovsky & Michael Schwarz, 2010. "Information Disclosure and Unraveling in Matching Markets," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 34-63, May.
    11. Morrison, Alan D. & White, Lucy, 2013. "Reputational contagion and optimal regulatory forbearance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(3), pages 642-658.
    12. Yaron Leitner, 2012. "Inducing Agents to Report Hidden Trades: A Theory of an Intermediary," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 16(4), pages 1013-1042.
    13. Edward Simpson Prescott, 2008. "Should bank supervisors disclose information about their banks?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 1-16.
    14. Diamond, Douglas W, 1985. " Optimal Release of Information by Firms," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1071-1094, September.
    15. Michael J. Fishman & Kathleen M. Hagerty, 2003. "Mandatory Versus Voluntary Disclosure in Markets with Informed and Uninformed Customers," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 45-63, April.
    16. Morrison, Alan & White, Lucy, 2013. "Reputational Contagion and Optimal Regulatory Forbearance," CEPR Discussion Papers 9508, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Michael J. Fishman & Kathleen M. Hagerty, 1990. "The Optimal Amount of Discretion to Allow in Disclosure," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 427-444.
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    1. repec:eee:gamebe:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:632-655 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Fausto Pacicco & Luigi Vena & Andrea Venegoni, 2017. "Full disclosure and financial stability: how does the market digest the transparency shock?," LIUC Papers in Economics 305, Cattaneo University (LIUC).
    3. Carboni, Marika & Fiordelisi, Franco & Ricci, Ornella & Lopes, Francesco Saverio Stentella, 2017. "Surprised or not surprised? The investors’ reaction to the comprehensive assessment preceding the launch of the banking union," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 122-132.
    4. Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie & Holthausen, Cornelia, 2015. "Liquidity hoarding and interbank market rates: The role of counterparty risk," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 336-354.
    5. Kowalik, Michal, 2016. "Opacity and Disclosure in Short-Term Wholesale Funding Markets," Risk and Policy Analysis Unit Working Paper RPA 16-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

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    Keywords

    Bayesian persuasion; Optimal disclosure; Stress tests;

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