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Designing Stress Scenarios

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  • Cecilia Parlatore

    (New York University Stern)

Abstract

We study the optimal design of scenarios by a risk-averse principal (e.g, a risk officer, a regulator) who seeks to learn about the exposures of agents (e.g., traders, banks) to a set of risk factors. We decompose the problem into a learning part and a design part. Conditional on the stress scenarios, we show how to apply a Kalman filter to solve the learning problem. The design of optimal scenarios is then a function of what the regulator wants to learn and of how she intends to intervene if she uncovers excessive exposures. We show how the optimal design depends on ex-ante leverage, the correlation of exposures within and across agents, and the non-linearities in potential losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Cecilia Parlatore, 2018. "Designing Stress Scenarios," 2018 Meeting Papers 1090, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed018:1090
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2018/paper_1090.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Joseba Martinez & Thomas Philippon, 2017. "Runs versus Lemons: Information Disclosure and Fiscal Capacity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1683-1707.
    2. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1971. "The Private and Social Value of Information and the Reward to Inventive Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 561-574, September.
    3. Donald P. Morgan & Stavros Peristiani & Vanessa Savino, 2014. "The Information Value of the Stress Test," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(7), pages 1479-1500, October.
    4. Petrella, Giovanni & Resti, Andrea, 2013. "Supervisors as information producers: Do stress tests reduce bank opaqueness?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5406-5420.
    5. Joel Shapiro & David Skeie, 2015. "Information Management in Banking Crises," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(8), pages 2322-2363.
    6. Flannery, Mark & Hirtle, Beverly & Kovner, Anna, 2017. "Evaluating the information in the federal reserve stress tests," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-18.
    7. Marcelo Fernandes & Deniz Igan & Marcelo Pinheiro, 2015. "March Madness in Wall Street: (What) Does the Market Learn from Stress Tests?," Working Papers 771, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    8. Schuermann, Til, 2016. "Stress Testing in Wartime and in Peacetime," Working Papers 17-01, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    9. Thomas Philippon & Pierre Pessarossi & Boubacar Camara, 2017. "Backtesting European Stress Tests," NBER Working Papers 23083, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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