IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cbi/ecolet/07-el-17.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Quantitative Easing and Portfolio Rebalancing: Micro Evidence from Irish Resident Banks

Author

Listed:
  • Bergant, Katharina

    (Central Bank of Ireland)

Abstract

This Economic Letter examines whether the portfolio rebalancing channel has been effective for Irish resident banks after the introduction of the ongoing Extended Asset Purchasing Programme (EAPP) initiated by the European Central Bank (ECB) in March 2015. Using a unique security level dataset on the programme’s purchases and banks’ holdings, I find that banks did not change purchasing trends regarding securities eligible to be bought under the EAPP. This is consistent with the hypothesis about exogenous constraints that might limit the pass-through of asset purchases to the real economy through the banking system.

Suggested Citation

  • Bergant, Katharina, 2017. "Quantitative Easing and Portfolio Rebalancing: Micro Evidence from Irish Resident Banks," Economic Letters 07/EL/17, Central Bank of Ireland.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbi:ecolet:07/el/17
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.centralbank.ie/docs/default-source/publications/economic-letters/vol-2017-no-7-quantitative-easing-and-portfolio-rebalancing-bergant.pdf?sfvrsn=4
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. De Long, J Bradford, et al, 1990. "Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 379-395, June.
    2. Timmer, Yannick, 2018. "Cyclical investment behavior across financial institutions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(2), pages 268-286.
    3. R. S.J. Koijen & F. Koulischer & B. Nguyen & M. Yogo, 2016. "Quantitative Easing in the Euro Area: The Dynamics of Risk Exposures and the Impact on Asset Prices," Working papers 601, Banque de France.
    4. Crosignani, Matteo & Faria-e-Castro, Miguel & Fonseca, Luís, 2020. "The (Unintended?) consequences of the largest liquidity injection ever," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 97-112.
    5. Alexander Rodnyansky & Olivier M. Darmouni, 2017. "The Effects of Quantitative Easing on Bank Lending Behavior," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(11), pages 3858-3887.
    6. Marco Di Maggio & Amir Kermani & Christopher Palmer, 2016. "How Quantitative Easing Works: Evidence on the Refinancing Channel," NBER Working Papers 22638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Luisa Carpinelli & Matteo Crosignani, 2017. "The Effect of Central Bank Liquidity Injections on Bank Credit Supply," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-038, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Giovanna Bua & Peter G. Dunne, 2019. "The Portfolio Rebalancing Effects of the ECB's Asset Purchase Programme," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 15(5), pages 1-46, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Giovanna Bua & Peter G. Dunne, 2019. "The Portfolio Rebalancing Effects of the ECB's Asset Purchase Programme," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 15(5), pages 1-46, December.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Albertazzi, Ugo & Barbiero, Francesca & Marqués-Ibáñez, David & Popov, Alexander & Rodriguez d’Acri, Costanza & Vlassopoulos, Thomas, 2020. "Monetary policy and bank stability: the analytical toolbox reviewed," Working Paper Series 2377, European Central Bank.
    2. Crosignani, Matteo & Faria-e-Castro, Miguel & Fonseca, Luís, 2020. "The (Unintended?) consequences of the largest liquidity injection ever," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 97-112.
    3. Peydró, José-Luis & Polo, Andrea & Sette, Enrico, 2021. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(3), pages 789-814.
    4. Viral V Acharya & Tim Eisert & Christian Eufinger & Christian Hirsch, 2019. "Whatever It Takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 32(9), pages 3366-3411.
    5. Matteo Benetton & Davide Fantino, 2018. "Competition and the pass-through of unconventional monetary policy: evidence from TLTROs," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1187, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Luck, Stephan & Zimmermann, Tom, 2020. "Employment effects of unconventional monetary policy: Evidence from QE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(3), pages 678-703.
    7. Machiel van Dijk & Andrei Dubovik, 2018. "Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy on European Corporate Credit," CPB Discussion Paper 372, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    8. Christian Bittner & Alexander Rodnyansky & Farzad Saidi & Yannick Timmer, 2021. "Mixing QE and Interest Rate Policies at the Effective Lower Bound: Micro Evidence from the Euro Area," CESifo Working Paper Series 9363, CESifo.
    9. Machiel van Dijk & Andrei Dubovik, 2018. "Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy on European Corporate Credit," CPB Discussion Paper 372.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    10. Óscar Arce & Sergio Mayordomo & Ricardo Gimeno, 2021. "Making Room for the Needy: The Credit-Reallocation Effects of the ECB’s Corporate QE [Whatever it takes: the real effects of unconventional monetary policy]," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 25(1), pages 43-84.
    11. Florian Heider & Farzad Saidi & Glenn Schepens, 2019. "Life below Zero: Bank Lending under Negative Policy Rates," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 32(10), pages 3728-3761.
    12. C. Cahn & A. Duquerroy & W. Mullins, 2017. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and Bank Lending Relationships," Working papers 659, Banque de France.
    13. Luisa Carpinelli & Matteo Crosignani, 2017. "The Effect of Central Bank Liquidity Injections on Bank Credit Supply," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-038, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    14. João F. Gomes & Marco Grotteria & Jessica Wachter, 2018. "Foreseen Risks," NBER Working Papers 25277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Martina Jasova & Caterina Mendicino & Dominik Supera, 2018. "Rollover Risk and Bank Lending Behavior: Evidence from Unconventional Central Bank Liquidity," 2018 Meeting Papers 500, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Bednarek, Peter & Dinger, Valeriya & te Kaat, Daniel Marcel & von Westernhagen, Natalja, 2020. "Central bank funding and credit risk-taking," Discussion Papers 36/2020, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    17. Kapoor, Supriya & Peia, Oana, 2021. "The impact of quantitative easing on liquidity creation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    18. Johannes Bubeck & Angela Maddaloni & José‐Luis Peydró, 2020. "Negative Monetary Policy Rates and Systemic Banks' Risk‐Taking: Evidence from the Euro Area Securities Register," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 52(S1), pages 197-231, October.
    19. Robert J. Kurtzman & Stephan Luck & Tom Zimmermann, 2017. "Did QE Lead Banks to Relax Their Lending Standards? Evidence from the Federal Reserve's LSAPs," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-093, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    20. Bednarek, Peter & Dinger, Valeriya & Kaat, Daniel Marcel te & Westernhagen, Natalja von, 2021. "To whom do banks channel central bank funds?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 128(C).

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cbi:ecolet:07/el/17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cbigvie.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Fiona Farrelly (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cbigvie.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.