IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to follow this author

Michael A. Clemens

This is information that was supplied by Michael Clemens in registering through RePEc. If you are Michael A. Clemens , you may change this information at the RePEc Author Service. Or if you are not registered and would like to be listed as well, register at the RePEc Author Service. When you register or update your RePEc registration, you may identify the papers and articles you have authored.

Personal Details

First Name:Michael
Middle Name:A.
Last Name:Clemens
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pcl20
Email:[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Homepage:http://www.cgdev.org/content/expert/detail/2570/
Postal Address:
Phone:
Location: Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
Homepage: http://www.cgdev.org/
Email:
Phone: 202.416.0700
Fax: 202.416.0750 |
Postal: 2055 L Street NW, 5th Floor, Washington DC 20036
Handle: RePEc:edi:cgdevus (more details at EDIRC)
Location: New York City, New York (United States)
Homepage: http://www.financialaccess.org
Email:
Phone: (+1) 212.998.7523
Fax: (+1) 212.995.4162
Postal: 295 Lafayette Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10012
Handle: RePEc:edi:fianyus (more details at EDIRC)
Location: Bonn, Germany
Homepage: http://www.iza.org/
Email:
Phone:
Fax:
Postal: P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn
Handle: RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations or Wikipedia entries:

  1. Economic Growth and Change of African Countries
in new window

  1. Michael Clemens, Colum Graham, and Stephen Howes, 2014. "Skill Development and Regional Mobility: Lessons from the Australia-Pacific Technical College - Working Paper 370," Working Papers 370, Center for Global Development.
  2. Clemens, Michael A. & McKenzie, David, 2014. "Why don't remittances appear to affect growth ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6856, The World Bank.
  3. Clemens, Michael A., 2014. "Does Development Reduce Migration?," IZA Discussion Papers 8592, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Michael Clemens, 2014. "A Case against Taxes and Quotas on High-Skill Emigration - Working Paper 363," Working Papers 363, Center for Global Development.
  5. Michael Clemens and David McKenzie, 2014. "Why Don't Remittances Appear to Affect Growth? - Working Paper 366," Working Papers 366, Center for Global Development.
  6. Michael Clemens, Çaglar Özden, and Hillel Rapoport, 2014. "Migration and Development Research Is Moving Far beyond Remittances - Working Paper 365," Working Papers 365, Center for Global Development.
  7. Michael Clemens, 2014. "Does Development Reduce Migration? - Working Paper 359," Working Papers 359, Center for Global Development.
  8. Michael Clemens and Timothy N. Ogden, 2014. "Migration as a Strategy for Household Finance: A Research Agenda on Remittances, Payments, and Development- Working Paper 354," Working Papers 354, Center for Global Development.
  9. Michael Clemens, 2013. "The Effect of Foreign Labor on Native Employment: A Job-Specific Approach and Application to North Carolina Farms- Working Paper 326," Working Papers 326, Center for Global Development.
  10. Michael Clemens, 2013. "Seize the Spotlight: A Case for Gulf Cooperation Council Engagement in Research on the Effects of Labor Migration," Working Papers id:5567, eSocialSciences.
  11. Michael Clemens, Gabriel Demombynes, 2013. "The New Transparency in Development Economics: Lessons from the Millennium Villages Controversy," Working Papers 342, Center for Global Development.
  12. Michael Clemens & Erwin Tiongson, 2012. "Split Decisions: Family finance when a policy discontinuity allocates overseas work," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1234, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  13. Aker, Jenny C. & Clemens, Michael A. & Ksoll, Christopher, 2011. "Mobiles and mobility: The Effect of Mobile Phones on Migration in Niger," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 2, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  14. Michael Clemens and Gabriel Demombynes, 2010. "When is the Rigorous Impact Evaluation of Development Projects a Luxury, and When Is It a Necessity?," Working Papers 225, Center for Global Development.
  15. Michael Clemens, 2010. "The Roots of Global Wage Gaps: Evidence from Randomized Processing of U.S. Visas," Working Papers 212, Center for Global Development.
  16. Michael Clemens, 2010. "A Labor Mobility Agenda for Development," Working Papers 201, Center for Global Development.
  17. Clemens, Michael A. & Demombynes, Gabriel, 2010. "When does rigorous impact evaluation make a difference ? the case of the millennium villages," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5477, The World Bank.
  18. Michael Clemens & Samuel Bazzi, 2009. "Blunt Instruments: On Establishing the Causes of Economic Growth," Working Papers 171, Center for Global Development.
  19. Clemens, Michael A., 2009. "Skill Flow: A Fundamental Reconsideration of Skilled-Worker Mobility and Development," MPRA Paper 19186, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  20. Michael Clemens & Lant Pritchett, 2008. "Income per natural: Measuring development as if people mattered more than places," Working Papers 143, Center for Global Development.
  21. Satish Chand & Michael A. Clemens, 2008. "Skilled emigration and skill creation: A quasi-experiment," International and Development Economics Working Papers idec08-05, International and Development Economics.
  22. Michael Clemens & Claudio Montenegro & Lant Pritchett, 2008. "The Place Premium: Wage Differences for Identical Workers across the U.S. Border," Working Papers 148, Center for Global Development.
  23. Michael Clemens, 2007. "Do Visas Kill? Health Effects of African Health Professional Emigration," Working Papers 114, Center for Global Development.
  24. Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers 95, Center for Global Development.
  25. Michael Clemens & Todd Moss, 2005. "Ghost of 0.7%: Origins and Relevance of the International Aid Target," Development and Comp Systems 0509006, EconWPA.
  26. Michael A. Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International education goals in historical perspective," Development and Comp Systems 0403007, EconWPA.
  27. Michael Clemens & Charles Kenny & Todd Moss, 2004. "The Trouble with the MDGs: Confronting Expectations of Aid and Development Success," Development and Comp Systems 0405011, EconWPA.
  28. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth," International Finance 0407010, EconWPA.
  29. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet, 2003. "The Millennium Challenge Account: How Much is Too Much, How Long is Long Enough?," Working Papers 23, Center for Global Development.
  30. Christopher Blattman & Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2003. "Who Protected and Why? Tariffs the World Around 1870-1938," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2010, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  31. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2002. "Closed Jaguar, Open Dragon: Comparing Tariffs in Latin America and Asia before World War II," NBER Working Papers 9401, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  32. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2002. "Why Did the Tariff-Growth Correlation Reverse After 1950?," NBER Working Papers 9181, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  33. Michael Clemens, 2002. "World Bank Capital Neither Complements Nor Substitutes for Private Capital," Working Papers 20, Center for Global Development.
  34. Michael Clemens, 2002. "Do Rich Countries Invest Less in Poor Countries than the Poor Countries Themselves?," Working Papers 19, Center for Global Development.
  35. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "A Tariff-Growth Paradox? Protection's Impact the World Around 1875-1997," NBER Working Papers 8459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  36. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2000. "Where did British Foreign Capital Go? Fundamentals, Failures and the Lucas Paradox: 1870-1913," NBER Working Papers 8028, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  1. Clemens, Michael A. & Özden, Çağlar & Rapoport, Hillel, 2014. "Migration and Development Research is Moving Far Beyond Remittances," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 121-124.
  2. Michael A. Clemens, 2013. "Why Do Programmers Earn More in Houston Than Hyderabad? Evidence from Randomized Processing of US Visas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 198-202, May.
  3. Michael Clemens & Gabriel Demombynes, 2013. "The New Transparency in Development Economics," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 14(4), pages 77-99, October.
  4. Samuel Bazzi & Michael A. Clemens, 2013. "Blunt Instruments: Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Identifying the Causes of Economic Growth," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 152-86, April.
  5. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil R. Bhavnani & Samuel Bazzi, 2012. "Counting Chickens when they Hatch: Timing and the Effects of Aid on Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(561), pages 590-617, 06.
  6. Michael A. Clemens, 2012. "L'affrontement entre les objectifs de développement et l'évaluation d'impact. The Collision of Development Goals and Impact Evaluation," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 20(4), pages 175-205.
  7. Clemens, Michael A. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2012. "Why were Latin America's tariffs so much higher than Asia's before 1950?," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 11-44, March.
  8. Michael A. Clemens & Gabriel Demombynes, 2011. "When does rigorous impact evaluation make a difference? The case of the Millennium Villages," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 305-339, September.
  9. Michael A. Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 83-106, Summer.
  10. Michael A. Clemens & Lant Pritchett, 2008. "Income per Natural: Measuring Development for People Rather Than Places," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(3), pages 395-434.
  11. Michael A. Clemens & Todd J. Moss, 2007. "The ghost of 0.7 per cent: origins and relevance of the international aid target," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 6(1), pages 3-25, June.
  12. Clemens, Michael A. & Kenny, Charles J. & Moss, Todd J., 2007. "The Trouble with the MDGs: Confronting Expectations of Aid and Development Success," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 735-751, May.
  13. Michael A. Clemens, 2006. "Coordination et utilisations des aides. Commentaires," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 14(2), pages 113-129.
  14. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2004. "Wealth bias in the first global capital market boom, 1870-1913," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(495), pages 304-337, 04.
  15. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2004. "Why did the Tariff--Growth Correlation Change after 1950?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 5-46, 03.
  16. Clemens, Michael A. & S. ReVelle, Charles & C. Williams, Justin, 1999. "Reserve design for species preservation," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 112(2), pages 273-283, January.
  17. Hamilton, Kirk & Clemens, Michael, 1999. "Genuine Savings Rates in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 333-56, May.
38 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (8) 2004-05-16 2004-07-26 2005-09-17 2006-08-19 2006-09-03 2007-03-17 2010-11-27 2014-01-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-07-27
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (21) 2004-03-28 2004-05-16 2005-09-17 2006-08-19 2006-08-26 2006-08-26 2007-03-17 2008-08-21 2008-09-13 2009-05-30 2009-10-03 2009-12-19 2010-02-05 2010-08-28 2010-11-27 2014-01-17 2014-05-09 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-12-19. Author is listed
  4. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2009-05-30
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2004-03-28 2006-08-26
  6. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (3) 2009-05-30 2014-05-09 2014-06-22
  7. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (4) 2014-05-09 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-12-19
  8. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2006-08-19
  9. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2004-03-28
  10. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (6) 2006-08-26 2008-09-13 2008-11-18 2009-10-03 2014-06-22 2014-07-05. Author is listed
  11. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (15) 2006-08-26 2008-08-21 2008-09-13 2008-09-13 2008-11-18 2009-09-26 2009-10-03 2009-12-19 2010-02-05 2010-07-17 2010-08-28 2011-07-27 2012-12-10 2012-12-22 2014-07-05. Author is listed
  12. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2001-09-10
  13. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2014-06-22 2014-06-22
  14. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (24) 2008-08-21 2008-09-13 2008-09-13 2008-11-18 2009-09-26 2009-10-03 2009-12-19 2010-02-05 2010-07-17 2010-08-28 2011-07-27 2012-12-10 2012-12-15 2012-12-22 2013-06-04 2014-05-09 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-06-22 2014-07-05 2014-08-20 2014-12-19. Author is listed
  15. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (2) 2010-11-27 2014-01-17
  16. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2014-06-22
  17. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2013-06-04
  18. NEP-TUR: Tourism Economics (1) 2010-11-27
This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Average Rank Score
  2. Number of Citations
  3. Number of Citations, Discounted by Citation Age
  4. Number of Citations, Weighted by Simple Impact Factor
  5. Number of Citations, Weighted by Simple Impact Factor, Discounted by Citation Age
  6. Number of Citations, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor
  7. Number of Citations, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor, Discounted by Citation Age
  8. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors
  9. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors, Discounted by Citation Age
  10. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Simple Impact Factors
  11. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Simple Impact Factors, Discounted by Citation Age
  12. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors
  13. Number of Citations, Weighted by Number of Authors and Recursive Impact Factors, Discounted by Citation Age
  14. h-index
  15. Number of Registered Citing Authors
  16. Number of Registered Citing Authors, Weighted by Rank (Max. 1 per Author)
  17. Number of Downloads through RePEc Services over the past 12 months
  18. Number of Downloads through RePEc Services over the past 12 months, Weighted by Number of Authors
  19. Breadth of citations across fields

Most cited item

Most downloaded item (past 12 months)

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Michael Clemens should log into the RePEc Author Service

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.