IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Why don't remittances appear to affect growth ?

  • Clemens, Michael A.
  • McKenzie, David

Although measured remittances by migrant workers have soared in recent years, macroeconomic studies have difficulty detecting their effect on economic growth. This paper reviews existing explanations for this puzzle and proposes three new ones. First, it offers evidence that a large majority of the recent rise in measured remittances may be illusory -- arising from changes in measurement, not changes in real financial flows. Second, it shows that even if these increases were correctly measured, cross-country regressions would have too little power to detect their effects on growth. Third, it points out that the greatest driver of rising remittances is rising migration, which has an opportunity cost to economic product at the origin. Net of that cost, there is little reason to expect large growth effects of remittances in the origin economy. Migration and remittances clearly have first-order effects on poverty at the origin, on the welfare of migrants and their families, and on global gross domestic product; but detecting their effects on growth of the origin economy is likely to remain elusive.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2014/05/06/000158349_20140506090632/Rendered/PDF/WPS6856.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6856.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 01 May 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6856
Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Rao, B.Bhaskara & Hassan, Gazi, 2009. "A panel data analysis of the growth effects of remittances," MPRA Paper 18021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Simone BERTOLI & Francesca Marchetta, 2014. "Migration, remittances and poverty in Ecuador," Working Papers halshs-00964332, HAL.
  3. Binzel, Christine & Assaad, Ragui, 2011. "Egyptian Men Working Abroad: Labor Supply Responses by the Women Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 5589, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. John Gibson & David McKenzie & Steven Stillman, 2011. "The Impacts of International Migration on Remaining Household Members: Omnibus Results from a Migration Lottery Program," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1297-1318, November.
  5. Jeffrey Frankel, 2011. "Are Bilateral Remittances Countercyclical?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 1-16, February.
  6. Raju Jan Singh & Kyung-woo Lee & Markus Haacker, 2009. "Determinants and Macroeconomic Impact of Remittances in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 09/216, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Catrinescu, Natalia & Leon-Ledesma, Miguel & Piracha, Matloob & Quillin, Bryce, 2009. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-92, January.
  8. Giuliano, Paola & Ruiz-Arranz, Marta, 2009. "Remittances, financial development, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 144-152, September.
  9. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Cynthis Bansak & Susan Pozo, 2005. "On the remitting patterns of immigrants: evidence from Mexican survey data," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 1, pages 37-58.
  10. Bollard, Albert & McKenzie, David & Morten, Melanie, 2010. "The remitting patterns of African migrants in the OECD," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5260, The World Bank.
  11. Giulia Bettin & Andrea Filippo Presbitero & Nikola Spatafora, 2014. "Remittances and vulnerability in developing countries," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 93, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
  12. Giulia Bettin & Alberto Zazzaro, 2012. "Remittances And Financial Development: Substitutes Or Complements In Economic Growth?," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 509-536, October.
  13. Antman, Francisca M., 2012. "The Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 6374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Isabel Ruiz & Elias Shukralla & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2009. "Remittances, Institutions and Growth: A Semiparametric Study," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 111-119.
  15. Freund, Caroline & Spatafora, Nikola, 2008. "Remittances, transaction costs, and informality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 356-366, June.
  16. Acosta, Pablo A. & Lartey, Emmanuel K.K. & Mandelman, Federico S., 2009. "Remittances and the Dutch disease," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 102-116, September.
  17. Mohammad Irfan, 2011. "Remittances and Poverty Linkages in Pakistan: Evidence and Some Suggestions for Further Analysis," PIDE-Working Papers 2011:78, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
  18. Alberto Posso, 2012. "Remittances And Aggregate Labor Supply: Evidence From Sixty‐Six Developing Nations," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 50(1), pages 25-39, 03.
  19. Yan Sun & Udo Kock, 2011. "Remittances in Pakistan; Why have they gone up, and why Aren't they coming down?," IMF Working Papers 11/200, International Monetary Fund.
  20. Jadotte, Evans, 2009. "International Migration, Remittances and Labour Supply: The Case of the Republic of Haiti," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  21. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
  22. Samuel Bazzi & Michael A. Clemens, 2013. "Blunt Instruments: Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Identifying the Causes of Economic Growth," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 152-86, April.
  23. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6856. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.