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Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth

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  • Catrinescu, Natalia
  • Leon-Ledesma, Miguel
  • Piracha, Matloob
  • Quillin, Bryce

Abstract

Summary There is considerable debate regarding the relative contribution of international migrants' remittances to sustainable economic development. While officially recorded remittances to developing countries have increased over the last decade, research has not come to a consensus over whether remittances have a positive or negative impact on long-run growth. This paper argues that contradictory findings have emerged when looking at the remittances-growth link because of an omitted variable bias: specifically, remittances will be more likely to contribute to longer-term growth in countries with higher quality political and economic policies and institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Catrinescu, Natalia & Leon-Ledesma, Miguel & Piracha, Matloob & Quillin, Bryce, 2009. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-92, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:1:p:81-92
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration remittances growth institutions growth regressions;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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