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The Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind

  • Antman, Francisca M.

    ()

    (University of Colorado, Boulder)

This paper addresses the effects of migration on families left behind and offers new evidence on the impact of migration on elderly parents. After discussing the identification issues involved in estimation, I review the literature on the effects of migration on the education and health of non-migrant children as well as the labor supply of non-migrant spouses. Finally, I address the impact of adult child migration on contributions toward non-migrant parents as well as the effects on parental health. Results show that elderly parents receive lower time contributions from all of their children when one child migrates.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp6374.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6374.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: A. F. Constant, K. F. Zimmermann (eds.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, Edward Elgar 2013, Cheltenham, UK, and Northampton, pp. 293-308
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6374
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  1. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, . "Brain drain and human capital formation in developing countries: winners and losers?," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10415, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. Boucher, Steve & Stark, Oded & Taylor, J. Edward, 2005. "A Gain with a Drain? Evidence from Rural Mexico on the New Economics of the Brain Drain," Working Papers 190907, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  3. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2011. "Eight Questions about Brain Drain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1111, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. David A. Grigorian & Tigran A. Melkonyan, 2011. "Destined to Receive: The Impact of Remittances on Household Decisions in Armenia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 139-153, 02.
  5. Dean Yang, 2008. "International Migration, Remittances and Household Investment: Evidence from Philippine Migrants' Exchange Rate Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 591-630, 04.
  6. Steven Stillman & John Gibson & David Mckenzie, 2012. "The Impact Of Immigration On Child Health: Experimental Evidence From A Migration Lottery Program," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 62-81, 01.
  7. Francisca M. Antman, 2010. "Adult Child Migration and the Health of Elderly Parents Left behind in Mexico," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 205-08, May.
  8. Macours, Karen & Vakis, Renos, 2008. "Seasonal Migration and Early Childhood Development," Working Paper Series RP2008/48, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  9. Catia Batista & Pedro C. Vicente, 2007. "Brain Drain or Brain Gain?Micro Evidence from an African Success Story," Economics Series Working Papers 343, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Mu, Ren & van de Walle, Dominique, 2011. "Left behind to farm? Women's labor re-allocation in rural China," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages S83-S97.
  11. John Giles & Ren Mu, 2007. "Elderly parent health and the migration decisions of adult children: Evidence from rural China," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 265-288, May.
  12. Antman, Francisca M., 2011. "The intergenerational effects of paternal migration on schooling and work: What can we learn from children's time allocations?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 200-208, November.
  13. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2014. "When Do Remittances Facilitate Asset Accumulation? The Importance of Remittance Income Uncertainty," IZA Discussion Papers 7983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Antman, Francisca M., 2012. "Gender, Educational Attainment, and the Impact of Parental Migration on Children Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 6640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Carlo Alcaraz & Daniel Chiquiar & Alejandrina Salcedo, 2010. "Remittances, Schooling, and Child Labor in Mexico," Working Papers 2010-14, Banco de México.
  16. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
  17. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Stillman, Steven, 2011. "What happens to diet and child health when migration splits households? Evidence from a migration lottery program," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 7-15, February.
  18. Pablo Acosta, 2011. "School Attendance, Child Labour, and Remittances from International Migration in El Salvador," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(6), pages 913-936.
  19. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
  20. Mariapia Mendola & Gero Carletto, 2008. "International migration and gender differentials in the home labor market: evidence from Albania," Working Papers 148, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2008.
  21. Giannelli, Gianna Claudia & Mangiavacchi, Lucia, 2010. "Children's Schooling and Parental Migration: Empirical Evidence on the "Left Behind" Generation in Albania," IZA Discussion Papers 4888, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  22. de Brauw, Alan & Giles, John, 2008. "Migrant opportunity and the educational attainment of youth in rural China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4526, The World Bank.
  23. Binzel, Christine & Assaad, Ragui, 2011. "Egyptian Men Working Abroad: Labor Supply Responses by the Women Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 5589, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  24. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Migration, Remittances, and Male and Female Employment Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 222-226, May.
  25. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Georges, Annie & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Migration, Remittances and Children’s Schooling in Haiti," IZA Discussion Papers 3657, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  26. Francisca M. Antman, 2011. "International Migration and Gender Discrimination among Children Left Behind," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 645-49, May.
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