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Women and Migration

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  • Antman, Francisca M.

    () (University of Colorado, Boulder)

Abstract

While scholars have long studied the economics of migration, increasing waves of international and regional migration around the world have placed greater focus on the varied impacts of migration in recent years. Critical to this line of research is an examination of the important role that women play in both sending and destination areas. This chapter addresses various aspects of the relationship between women and migration, including key ways in which non-migrant women are affected by migration, as well as how female migrants affect families and labor markets in both source and destination communities. Selection factors and determinants of female migration, as well as the gendered impacts of migrant networks, are also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Antman, Francisca M., 2018. "Women and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 11282, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11282
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11282.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migrant selection; women; left behind; gender; migration; networks;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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