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Gender and Remittances: Evidence from Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Elke Holst
  • Andrea Schäfer
  • Mechthild Schrooten

Abstract

This study focuses on gender-specific determinants of remittances in Germany. The conceptual approach considers gender roles and naturalization to be crucial in the immigrant's decision to remit. For the empirical investigation, the authors use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study for the years 2001--6. The findings show, first, that individual income differences in the country of residence cannot sufficiently explain why foreign national women remit less than men in absolute terms. Second, men who are naturalized citizens remit far less than men who are foreign nationals. Thus, in the group of naturalized German citizens, gender differences in the amount of remittances disappear. This can be explained by the fact that acquisition of citizenship makes family reunification in Germany more likely. Third, network structures in the country of origin might help to explain differences between men and women and between foreign nationals and naturalized citizens in the amount remitted.

Suggested Citation

  • Elke Holst & Andrea Schäfer & Mechthild Schrooten, 2012. "Gender and Remittances: Evidence from Germany," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 201-229, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:18:y:2012:i:2:p:201-229
    DOI: 10.1080/13545701.2012.692478
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13545701.2012.692478
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    Cited by:

    1. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2016. "Remittances and the Changing Composition of Migration," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 513-529, April.
    2. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti & Claudia Pigini, 2016. "State dependence and unobserved heterogeneity in a double hurdle model for remittances: evidence from immigrants to Germany," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 127, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    3. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2016. "Steady streams and sudden bursts: persistence patterns in remittance decisions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 263-292, January.
    4. Maelan Le Goff, 2016. "Feminization of migration and trends in remittances," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 220-220, January.
    5. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Changes in Migration Patterns and Remittances: Do Females and Skilled Migrants Remit More?," Working Papers 2015-15, CEPII research center.
    6. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9533-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Antman, Francisca M., 2018. "Women and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 11282, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Kaczmarczyk, Pawel, 2013. "Money for Nothing? Ukrainian Immigrants in Poland and their Remitting Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 7666, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Amoyaw, Jonathan Anim & Abada, Teresa, 2016. "Does helping them benefit me? Examining the emotional cost and benefit of immigrants' pecuniary remittance behaviour in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 182-192.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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