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Remittances and Child Labour in Africa: Evidence from Burkina Faso

  • Bargain, Olivier

    ()

    (University of Aix-Marseille II)

  • Boutin, Delphine

    ()

    (CERDI, University of Auvergne)

This paper explores the effects of remittance receipt on child labour in an African context. We focus on Burkina Faso, a country with a high prevalence of child labour and a high rate of migration. Given the complex relationship between remittance receipt and household time allocation decisions, we instrument remittances using economic conditions in remittance-sending countries and explore heterogeneous effects across different types of potential remitters. While remittances have no significant effect on child labour on average, transfers reduce child labour in long-term migrant households, for whom the disruptive effect of migration is no longer felt. We find no gender difference but remittances seem to affect mainly the labour market participation of younger children.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 8007.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as 'Remittance Effects on Child Labour: Evidence from Burkina Faso' in: Journal of Development Studies, 2015, 51(7), 922-938
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8007
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