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How Do Remittances Affect Human Capital Formation of School-Age Boys and Girls?


  • Cynthia Bansak
  • Brian Chezum


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Cynthia Bansak & Brian Chezum, 2009. "How Do Remittances Affect Human Capital Formation of School-Age Boys and Girls?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 145-148, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:145-48 Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.145

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Devine, Theresa J, 1994. "Changes in Wage-and-Salary Returns to Skill and the Recent Rise in Female Self-Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 108-113, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Höckel, Lisa Sofie & Santos Silva, Manuel & Stöhr, Tobias, 2015. "Can parental migration reduce petty corruption in education?," Kiel Working Papers 2018, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Arezki, Rabah & Brückner, Markus, 2012. "Rainfall, financial development, and remittances: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 377-385.
    3. Leonardo Bonilla Mejía, 2016. "Choques externos y remesas internacionales en las regiones de Colombia," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 250, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    4. Jean Louis Combes & Christian Ebeke & Mathilde Maurel, 2015. "The effect of remittances prior to an election," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(38), pages 4074-4089, August.
    5. Ebeke, Christian Hubert, 2012. "The power of remittances on the international prevalence of child labor," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 452-462.
    6. Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Nguyen, Hoa Quynh, 2015. "Do internal and international remittances matter to health, education and labor of children and adolescents? The case of Vietnam," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 28-34.
    7. Koska, Onur A. & Saygin, Perihan Özge & Çağatay, Selim & Artal-Tur, Andrés, 2013. "International migration, remittances, and the human capital formation of Egyptian children," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 38-50.
    8. Alassane DRABO & Christian EBEKE, 2010. "Remittances, Public Health Spending and Foreign Aid in the Access to Health Care Services in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201004, CERDI.
    9. Jean-Louis COMBES & Christian EBEKE & Mathilde MAUREL, 2011. "Remittances and the Prevalence of Working Poor," Working Papers 201109, CERDI.
    10. Yiwen Chen & Benteng Zou, 2016. "To Migrate With or Without the Children—A Theoretical Note," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-21, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    11. Bargain, Olivier & Boutin, Delphine, 2014. "Remittances and Child Labour in Africa: Evidence from Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 8007, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Cynthia Bansak & Brian Chezum & Animesh Giri, 2015. "Remittances, school quality, and household education expenditures in Nepal," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    13. Nguyen, Cuong & Nguyen, Hoa, 2013. "Do Internal and International Remittances Matter to Health, Education and Labor of Children? The Case of Vietnam," MPRA Paper 48672, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Iuliia Kuntsevych, 2017. "Remittances, Spending and Political Instability in Ukraine," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp583, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    15. DELOGU Marco & DOCQUIER Frédéric & MACHADO Joël, 2017. "Globalizing labor and the world economy: the role of human capital," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-16, LISER.
    16. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:30:y:2010:i:1:p:351-364 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations


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