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Age-of-Arrival Effects on the Education of Immigrant Children: A Sibling Study

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  • Sukanya Basu

    (Vassar College)

Abstract

We analysed the effects of late entry on the human capital of immigrant children, and investigated the channels via which age-at-migration affects the native-immigrant education gap. Ordinary-least-squares estimates could have been biased if parents factored the age of children into their migration decision. Using a sample of siblings from the 2000 US Census, we employed a family fixed-effects estimation strategy and found a negative and convex relationship between human capital and age-of-arrival. Teenage entrants’ outcomes were worst affected compared to younger entrants. Language was found to be an important mediating factor via which age-of-arrival influenced education. The critical age for English proficiency was 8–10. Age-of-arrival affected education not only through language but also via heterogeneous origin country conditions. The additional privileges of birth-right citizenship, if any, were disentangled from the benefits of zero age-of-arrival for natives. Citizenship by birth provided few advantages, except for college enrollment. Results were robust to sample selection changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Sukanya Basu, 2018. "Age-of-Arrival Effects on the Education of Immigrant Children: A Sibling Study," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 474-493, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:39:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10834-018-9569-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-018-9569-4
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    2. Raj Chetty & Nathaniel Hendren & Lawrence F. Katz, 2016. "The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(4), pages 855-902, April.
    3. Tushar Bharati & Thea Harpley Green, 2021. "Age at school transition and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 21-06, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    4. Xiaohui Sophie Li, 2021. "What Impacts Young Generations’ School/College Education Through the Lens of Family Economics? A Review on JFEI Publications in the Past Ten Years," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 118-123, July.
    5. Nathan Deutscher, 2020. "Place, Peers, and the Teenage Years: Long-Run Neighborhood Effects in Australia," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 220-249, April.
    6. Murat Guray Kirdar & Ismet Koc & Meltem Dayıoglu, 2021. "School Integration of Refugee Children: Evidence from the Largest Refugee Group in any Country," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 2116, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    7. Hélio Manhica & Susanna Toivanen & Anders Hjern & Mikael Rostila, 2015. "Mortality in Adult Offspring of Immigrants: A Swedish National Cohort Study," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(2), pages 1-11, February.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Age-of-arrival; Education; Immigrant children; Siblings study; Family fixed-effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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