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Age at Immigration and High School Dropouts

Author

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  • Cohen Goldner, Sarit

    () (Bar-Ilan University)

  • Epstein, Gil S.

    () (Bar-Ilan University)

Abstract

We focus on high school dropout rate among male and female immigrant children. We consider the relationship between the dropout rate and age of arrival of the immigrants. Using repeated cross sectional data from the Israeli Labor Force Surveys of 1996-2011 we show that the share of high school dropouts among immigrant children who arrived from the Former Soviet Union during 1989-1994 is at least as double than among natives in the same age group. Further, we show that among immigrant youth there is a monotonic negative relation between age at arrival and the share of high school dropouts. To understand our results we present a theoretical framework that links between age at arrival in the host country, language proficiency, quality of education and wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Cohen Goldner, Sarit & Epstein, Gil S., 2014. "Age at Immigration and High School Dropouts," IZA Discussion Papers 8378, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8378
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 1994. "The determinants of post-immigration investments in education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 163-177, June.
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    13. Chiswick, Barry R. & DebBurman, Noyna, 2004. "Educational attainment: analysis by immigrant generation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 361-379, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yu Aoki & Lualhati Santiago, 2015. "Fertility, Health and Education of UK Immigrants: The Role of English Language Skills," CINCH Working Paper Series 1510, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Aug 2015.
    2. Peter Huber, 2015. "What Institutions Help Immigrants Integrate? WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 77," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57884, January.
    3. N. N., 2017. "WIFO-Monatsberichte, Heft 7/2017," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(7), July.
    4. Peter Huber & Marian Fink & Thomas Horvath, 2020. "Data Sources on Migrants' Labour Market and Education Integration in Austria," WIFO Working Papers 613, WIFO.
    5. Aoki, Yu & Santiago, Lualhati, 2018. "Speak better, do better? Education and health of migrants in the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1-17.
    6. Peter Huber & Georg Böhs, 2017. "Erfassung von Asylwerberinnen und Asylwerbern der Jahre 2005 bis 2014 auf Grundlage von Krankenversicherungsdaten und deren Arbeitsmarktkarriere," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 60720, January.
    7. Sukanya Basu, 2018. "Age-of-Arrival Effects on the Education of Immigrant Children: A Sibling Study," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 474-493, September.
    8. Peter Huber & Thomas Horvath & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2017. "Österreich 2025 – Österreich als Zuwanderungsland," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(7), pages 581-588, July.
    9. Aoki, Yu & Santiago, Lualhati, 2015. "Education, Health and Fertility of UK Immigrants: The Role of English Language Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 9498, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Grațiela Georgiana Noja & Nebojša Petrović & Mirela Cristea, 2018. "Turning points in migrants’ labour market integration in Europe and benefit spillovers for Romania and Serbia: the role of socio-psychological credentials," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 489-518.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    high-school dropouts; age at arrival; immigrants;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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