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What Impacts Young Generations’ School/College Education Through the Lens of Family Economics? A Review on JFEI Publications in the Past Ten Years

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  • Xiaohui Sophie Li

    (Northern Illinois University)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to review a group of selected papers on the theme of education published in the Journal of Family and Economic Issues from the past 10 years to see what we have come to know regarding what impacted young generations’ school/college education from the lens of family economics, as well as to share our thoughts on future directions to move the research inquiry forward. The paper first gives a brief description on all articles selected for this review. Followed by, a discussion of findings of these studies from the lens of macro-meso-micro analysis. Gaps in research ideas and methodology as well as future research directions are discussed in the end.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaohui Sophie Li, 2021. "What Impacts Young Generations’ School/College Education Through the Lens of Family Economics? A Review on JFEI Publications in the Past Ten Years," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 118-123, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:42:y:2021:i:1:d:10.1007_s10834-020-09726-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-020-09726-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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