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Simulating the impacts of cash transfers on poverty and school attendance: The case of Cambodia

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  • Meng, Channarith
  • Pfau, Wade Donald

Abstract

Using the Cambodia Socioeconomic Survey 2004 and employing micro-static simulation techniques, we measure the potential impacts of cash transfer programs for children to identify targeted groups that will have the most effect on poverty and school attendance. We conclude that the largest impacts occur by targeting poor children. If this proves to be too administratively costly, then targeting children in rural areas or targeting all children living in the ten poorest provinces will also yield significant poverty reduction. With regard to improving school attendance, the same targeted groups generally provide the biggest impacts as well, though the impacts on school attendance tend to be smaller than on poverty reduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Meng, Channarith & Pfau, Wade Donald, 2011. "Simulating the impacts of cash transfers on poverty and school attendance: The case of Cambodia," MPRA Paper 30472, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Xiaohui Sophie Li, 2021. "What Impacts Young Generations’ School/College Education Through the Lens of Family Economics? A Review on JFEI Publications in the Past Ten Years," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 118-123, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cash transfer; poverty; school attendance; Cambodia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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