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Child Labor in the Global Economy

  • Eric V. Edmonds
  • Nina Pavcnik

Few issues in developing countries draw as much popular attention as child labor. This paper begins by quantifying the extent and main characteristics of child labor. It then considers the evidence on a range of issues about child labor. Fundamentally, child labor is a symptom of poverty. Low income and poor institutions are driving forces behind the prevalence of child labor worldwide. This study concludes by assessing the policy options to reduce worldwide child labor.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/0895330053147895
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Volume (Year): 19 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (Winter)
Pages: 199-220

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:19:y:2005:i:1:p:199-220
Note: DOI: 10.1257/0895330053147895
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  12. Edmonds, Eric V & Pavcnik, Nina, 2004. "International Trade and Child Labour: Cross-Country Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 4309, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  17. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
  18. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H & Gatti, Roberta, 2005. "Child Labour, Crop Shocks and Credit Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 4881, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  19. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2003. "Halving Global Poverty," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
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