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Determinantes y consecuencias del trabajo infantil: un análisis de la literatura

  • Karina Acevedo González

    ()

  • Raúl Quejada Pérez
  • Martha Yánez Contreras
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    El presente artículo presenta los resultados de una revisión sistemática de la literatura que analiza uno de los fenómenos más complejos del mercado laboral: el trabajo infantil. El ejercicio muestra que los mayores desarrollos teóricos y empíricos se concentran en el estudio de la relación entre el trabajo de los menores y las variables de capital humano, en especial, la educación y la salud; relaciones complejas debido a que no existe una contundente evidencia de los efectos negativos del trabajo de los niños sobre estas variables. El documento destaca que con los desarrollos más recientes de la literatura se han desvirtuado hipótesis como el "luxury axiom", que atribuye el problema a la pobreza, y aparecen enfoques más amplios que incluyen los efectos de los mercados imperfectos, las migraciones y los programas de transferencias sobre el fenómeno de estudio.

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    Article provided by UNIVERSIDAD MILITAR NUEVA GRANADA in its journal REVISTA FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS ECONÓMICAS.

    Volume (Year): (2011)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:col:000180:011663
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