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Poverty, Household Size and Child Welfare in India

Author

Listed:
  • Ray, R.

Abstract

This study uses Indian unit record data from expenditure and employment surveys, in conjunction with State level indicators, to (a) investigate whether the backward classes and female headed households face higher poverty rates than other, and (b) examine the impact of poverty, along with a host of individual, family, socio economic and State characteristics, on child labour and child schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Ray, R., 1999. "Poverty, Household Size and Child Welfare in India," Papers 1999-01, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:tasman:1999-01
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arindam Banik & Pradip K. Bhaumik, 2005. "Supporting the poor but skilled artisans by making assets available to them: an empirical investigation in rural India," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 45-66.
    2. Ray, R., 2001. "Simultaneous Analysis of Child Labour and Child Schooling: Comparative Evidence from Nepal and Pakistan," Papers 2001-04, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
    3. Jayaraj, D. & Subramanian, S., 2005. "Out of School and (Probably) in Work: Child Labour and Capability Deprivation in India," WIDER Working Paper Series 055, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Sarbajit Chaudhuri & Jayanta Kumar Dwibedi, 2007. "Foreign Capital Inflow, Fiscal Policies And Incidence Of Child Labour In A Developing Economy," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(1), pages 17-46, January.
    5. Chaudhuri, Sarbajit & Mukhopadhyay, Ujjaini, 2009. "Revisiting the Informal Sector: A General Equilibrium Approach," MPRA Paper 52135, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Jafarey, Saqib & Lahiri, Sajal, 2002. "Will trade sanctions reduce child labour?: The role of credit markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 137-156, June.
    7. Debdulal Thakur & Shrabani Mukherjee, 2015. "Parent’s Choice Function for Ward’s School Continuation in Rural India: A Case Study in West Bengal," Working Papers 2015-106, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    8. Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2004. "Incidence of Child Labour, Free Education Policy, and Economic Liberalisation in a Developing Economy," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 1-25.
    9. Karamat Ali & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2004. "Simultaneous Decision Making of Child Schooling and Child Labour in Pakistani Urban Households," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 9(1), pages 127-148, Jan-June.
    10. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Karamat Ali, 2005. "Economically Active Children and Home-care Children: How Much They Differ," Labor and Demography 0510013, EconWPA.
    11. Geoffrey Lancaster & Ranjan Ray, 2004. "Does Child Labour Affect School Attendance and School Performance?Multi Country Evidence on SIMPOC data," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 68, Econometric Society.
    12. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2003. "Children in Different Activities: Child Schooling and Child Labour," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 137-160.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ECONOMETRICS ; REGRESSION ANALYSIS ; POVERTY ; SOCIAL WELFARE ; CHILDREN ; INDIA;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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