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Gender, caste and poverty in India: evidence from the National Family Health Survey

Author

Listed:
  • William D. Lastrapes

    () (University of Georgia)

  • Ramaprasad Rajaram

    () (Athena Infonomics
    Social Sciences and Trans-disciplinary Research)

Abstract

Abstract This paper estimates the effects of gender and social caste on poverty in India using measures of household wealth from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS). Our asset-based measures of poverty are conceptually different than official measures based on consumption expenditures. For the period 2005–2006, we find that female-headed households and households belonging to marginalized social classes are more likely to be poor than their counterparts. Whether a household belongs to marginalized social class is more strongly associated with poverty than the gender of the household head.

Suggested Citation

  • William D. Lastrapes & Ramaprasad Rajaram, 2016. "Gender, caste and poverty in India: evidence from the National Family Health Survey," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 6(2), pages 153-171, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurase:v:6:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s40822-015-0043-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s40822-015-0043-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Poverty; Female headed households; Gender inequality; Social caste;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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