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Caste and Tribe Inequality: Evidence from India, 1983-1999

  • Kijima, Yoko

Despite policies targeting scheduled castes (SC) and scheduled tribes (ST), there remain large disparities of living standards between SC/ST and non-SC/ST households in India. The SC/ST households may be poorer because they possess lower human and physical capital, but they may also earn lower returns to these assets. This study finds that 30%-50% of the welfare disparities are attributable to different returns. Such structural differences between the SC and the non-SC/ST are partly because the SC earn lower returns to schooling. A large part of the structural disparities between the ST and the non-SC/ST comes from the fact that the areas where the ST live are different from those where the non-SC/ST live. In addition, the ST tend to earn lower returns even with controls for geographical conditions.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/497008
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 54 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 369-404

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:2:p:369-404
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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  1. Ben Rogaly & Daniel Coppard & Abdur Safique & Kumar Rana & Amrita Sengupta & Jhuma Biswas, 2002. "Seasonal Migration and Welfare/Illfare in Eastern India: A Social Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(5), pages 89-114.
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  6. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  7. David Neumark, 1988. "Employers' Discriminatory Behavior and the Estimation of Wage Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(3), pages 279-295.
  8. Kochar, Anjini, 2004. "Urban influences on rural schooling in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 113-136, June.
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  11. repec:pri:rpdevs:tarozzi_estimating_comparable_poverty is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Alessandro Tarozzi, 2002. "Estimating Comparable Poverty Counts from Incomparable Surveys: Measuring Poverty in India," Working Papers 186, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
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