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What has luck got to do with it? A regional analysis of poverty and agricultural growth in rural India

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  • Richard Palmer-Jones
  • Kunal Sen

Abstract

This article explores the role of agro-ecological factors associated with agricultural growth and poverty outcomes in India. Using a new operationalisation of agro-ecological factors and incorporating within-State variations in poverty and other variables we show that agricultural growth and poverty reduction appear to depend on underlying agro-ecological conditions which are favourable to the spread of irrigation and hence agricultural development, which in turn in associated with poverty reduction. Promotion of agriculture in less favoured areas in unlikely to have similar effects on agriculture in less favoured areas is unlikely to have similar effects on agricultural growth even if the effects of agricultural growth on poverty remain similar, unless conditions for irrigation are favourable or rainfall is sufficiently abundant and reliable. This suggests that considerable caution may be needed in drawing policy conclusions from empirical analysis by state alone, and without regard to their underlying factor endowments.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Palmer-Jones & Kunal Sen, 2003. "What has luck got to do with it? A regional analysis of poverty and agricultural growth in rural India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 1-31.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:40:y:2003:i:1:p:1-31
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380412331293647
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vegard Iversen & Adriaan Kalwij & Arjan Verschoor & Amaresh Dubey, 2014. "Caste Dominance and Economic Performance in Rural India," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(3), pages 423-457.
    2. Ira N. Gang & Kunal Sen & Myeong-Su Yun, 2008. "Was the Mandal Commission Right? Living Standard Differences between Backward Classes and Other Social Groups in India," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 08-12, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    3. Ashok Kotwal & Bharat Ramaswami & Wilima Wadhwa, 2011. "Economic Liberalization and Indian Economic Growth: What's the Evidence?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1152-1199, December.
    4. John C. Anyanwu, 2014. "Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009/2010 Survey Data," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 118-137, March.
    5. Himanshu & Kunal Sen, 2014. "Revisiting the Great Indian Poverty Debate: Measurement, Patterns, and Determinants," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 20314, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    6. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:29:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1057_s41287-016-0011-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ira N. Gang & Kunal Sen & Myeong-Su Yun, 2017. "Is Caste Destiny? Occupational Diversification among Dalits in Rural India," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 476-492, April.
    8. Purnima Purohit & Katsushi S. Imai & Kunal Sen, 2017. "Do Agricultural Marketing Laws Matter for Rural Growth? Evidence from the Indian States," Discussion Paper Series DP2017-17, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    9. Ira N. Gang & Kunal Sen & Myeong-Su Yun, 2008. "Poverty In Rural India: Caste And Tribe," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(1), pages 50-70, March.
    10. Mogues, Tewodaj & Yu, Bingxin & Fan, Shenggen & Mcbride, Linden, 2012. "The impacts of public investment in and for agriculture: Synthesis of the existing evidence," IFPRI discussion papers 1217, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Kanika Mahajan & Bharat Ramaswami, 2017. "Caste, Female Labor Supply, and the Gender Wage Gap in India: Boserup Revisited," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 339-378.
    12. Mukherji, Aditi, 2007. "The energy-irrigation nexus and its impact on groundwater markets in eastern Indo-Gangetic basin: Evidence from West Bengal, India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6413-6430, December.
    13. Kim, Rockli & Mohanty, Sanjay K. & Subramanian, S.V., 2016. "Multilevel Geographies of Poverty in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 349-359.
    14. Calì, Massimiliano & Sen, Kunal, 2011. "Do Effective State Business Relations Matter for Economic Growth? Evidence from Indian States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1542-1557, September.
    15. John Anyanwu, 2013. "Working Paper 180 - Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009-2010 Survey Data," Working Paper Series 978, African Development Bank.
    16. Michelle Baddeley & Kirsty McNay & Robert Cassen, 2006. "Divergence in India: Income differentials at the state level, 1970-97," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(6), pages 1000-1022.
    17. Kunal Sen, 2009. "International Trade and Manufacturing Employment: Is India following the Footsteps of Asia or Africa?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 765-777, November.
    18. John Anyanwu, 2013. "Working Paper 181 - Determining the Correlates of Poverty for Inclusive Growth in Africa," Working Paper Series 979, African Development Bank.
    19. Rew, Alan & Khan, Shahzad & Rew, Martin, 2007. ""P3 > Q2" in Northern Orissa: An Example of Integrating "Combined Methods" (Q2) Through a "Platform for Probing Poverties" (P3)," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 281-295, February.
    20. Sen, Kunal, 2008. "International Trade and Manufacturing Employment Outcomes in India: A Comparative Study," WIDER Working Paper Series 087, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    21. T. Krishna Kumar & Sushanta Mallick & Jayarama Holla, 2009. "Estimating Consumption Deprivation in India Using Survey Data: A State-Level Rural-Urban Analysis Before and During Reform Period," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 441-470.

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