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Children in Different Activities: Child Schooling and Child Labour

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  • Rana Ejaz Ali Khan

    (Government Faridia College, Pakpattan, Pakistan.)

Abstract

Using primary data from two districts of Pakistan, this article analyses the supplyside determinants of child labour. The study finds that the birth-order of the child has a significant association with schooling and labour decision of child: first school enrolment of children is delayed; there exists gender disparity in favour of male children; the children from female-headed households are more likely to go to school; the education of the head of household has a positive impact on child’s schooling; among the parent’s parameters mother’s education is more important than father’s; parental education is positively associated with child schooling and negatively associated with child labour. The ownership of assets impacts the schooling positively, and labour negatively; the household size affects the schooling negatively, and work positively; and household composition also has a significant effect on schooling and child labour. The children from urban areas are more likely to go to school.

Suggested Citation

  • Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2003. "Children in Different Activities: Child Schooling and Child Labour," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 137-160.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:journl:v:42:y:2003:i:2:p:137-160
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    File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/PDR/2003/Volume2/137-160.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kamalika Chakraborty & Bidisha Chakraborty, 2019. "Will An Increase In Landholding Size Reduce Child Labour In The Presence Of Unemployment? A Theoretical Analysis," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 64(221), pages 85-106, April – J.
    2. Rashida Haq, 2004. "Transition of Poverty in Pakistan: Evidence from the Longitudinal Data," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(4), pages 895-909.
    3. Ambreen Fatima, 2017. "Child labour in Pakistan: Addressing supply and demand side labour market dynamics," The Economic and Labour Relations Review, , vol. 28(2), pages 294-311, June.
    4. Kulsoom, Rafia, 2007. "Child Labor at District Level: A Case Study of Rawalpindi," MPRA Paper 17224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Muhammad Irfan, 2010. "A Review of the Labour Market Research at PIDE 1957-2009," PIDE Books, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, number 2010:1 edited by Rashid Amjad & Aurangzeb A. Hashmi.
    6. Chakraborty, Kamalika & Chakraborty, Bidisha, 2016. "Will increase in size of landholding reduce child labour in presence of unemployment? A theoretical analysis," MPRA Paper 74206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Chakraborty, Bidisha & Chakraborty, Kamalika, 2016. "Low Level Equilibrium Trap, Unemployment, School Quality, Child Labour and Human Capital Formation," MPRA Paper 74621, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sumbal Shahid & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2020. "Informal Sector Economy, Child Labor and Economic Growth in Developing Economies: Exploring the Interlinkages," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 8(4), pages 277-287, December.
    9. Kamalika Chakraborty & Bidisha Chakraborty, 2018. "Low level equilibrium trap, unemployment, efficiency of education system, child labour and human capital formation," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 69-95, September.

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