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Why do Indian Children Work, and is it Bad for Them?

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Listed:
  • Alessandro Cigno

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  • Furio C. Rosati

Abstract

The causes and consequences of child labour are examined theoretically and empirically within a household decision framework, with endogenous fertility and mortality. The data come from a nationally representative survey of Indian rural households. [IZA Discussion Paper No. 115].

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Cigno & Furio C. Rosati, 2007. "Why do Indian Children Work, and is it Bad for Them?," Working Papers id:1252, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1252
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Bellettini & Carlotta Berti Ceroni & Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, 2005. "Child Labour and Resistance to Change," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(3), pages 397-411, August.
    2. Nielsen, H.S. & Dubey, A., 2001. "Child Labor: A Microeconomic Perspective," Papers 01-10, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
    3. Basu, Kaushik, 2003. "Policy Dilemmas for Controlling Child Labor," Working Papers 03-11, Cornell University, Center for Analytic Economics.
    4. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2004-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mukherjee, Dipa, 2010. "Child workers in India: an overview of macro dimensions," MPRA Paper 35049, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.
    6. Ray, R., 2001. "Simultaneous Analysis of Child Labour and Child Schooling: Comparative Evidence from Nepal and Pakistan," Papers 2001-04, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
    7. Basab Dasgupta, 2005. "Liquidity Constraint and Child Labor In India: Is Market Really Incapable Of Eradicating It From Wage-Labor Households?," Working papers 2005-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    8. Dohmen, Thomas J., 2005. "Housing, mobility and unemployment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 305-325, May.
    9. Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2015. "The impact of remittances on household investments in children's human capital: Evidence from Morocco," Working Papers 2015-2016_4, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Sep 2015.
    10. Sundaram, Aparna & Vanneman, Reeve, 2008. "Gender Differentials in Literacy in India: The Intriguing Relationship with Women's Labor Force Participation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 128-143, January.
    11. repec:wsi:wschap:9789812798091_0017 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ranjan Ray, 2001. "Child Labour and Child Schooling in South Asia: A Cross Country Study of their Determinants," ASARC Working Papers 2001-09, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    13. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 17, pages 623-687 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    14. Alessandro Maffei & Nikolai Raabe & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2006. "Political Repression and Child Labour: Theory and Empirical Evidence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(2), pages 211-239, February.
    15. FurioCamillo Rosati & Zafiris Tzannatos, 2006. "Child Labour In Vietnam," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, February.
    16. Shirit Katav-Herz, 2003. "A Model of Parental Demand for Child Labor with High Fertility Norms," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 219-233, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    schooling; Nutritional status; welfare; India; gender; child labour; education; fertility; anthropometry; household economics; rural; mortality; endogenous; school; public health; labour participation; health; educational policies;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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