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The impact of remittances on household investments in children's human capital: Evidence from Morocco

Listed author(s):
  • Jamal BOUOIYOUR
  • Amal MIFTAH

Using a nationally-representative household data set from Morocco, the present study seeks to estimate the effects of migrants' remittances on household investments in children's human capital. Three findings emerge. First, children in remittance-receiving households are more likely to attend school and less likely to drop out compared with those in non-remittance-receiving households. Second, children's participation in labor market decreases in the presence of international remittances. Third, we find remittances to be associated with significantly lower level of no schooling for girls. These findings support the growing view that remittances can help increase the educational opportunities, especially for female children.

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File URL: http://catt.univ-pau.fr/live/digitalAssets/144/144916_2015_2016_4docWCATT_Remittances_Household_Investments_Children_Morocco_JBouoiyour_AMiftah.pdf
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Paper provided by CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour in its series Working Papers with number 2015-2016_4.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2015
Date of revision: Sep 2015
Handle: RePEc:tac:wpaper:2015-2016_4
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