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The impact of remittances on household investments in children's human capital: Evidence from Morocco

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  • Jamal BOUOIYOUR
  • Amal MIFTAH

Abstract

Using a nationally-representative household data set from Morocco, the present study seeks to estimate the effects of migrants’ remittances on household investments in children's human capital. Three findings emerge. First, children in remittance-receiving households are more likely to attend school and less likely to drop out compared with those in non-remittance-receiving households. Second, children’s participation in labor market decreases in the presence of international remittances. Third, we find remittances to be associated with significantly lower level of no schooling for girls. These findings support the growing view that remittances can help increase the educational opportunities, especially for female children.

Suggested Citation

  • Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2015. "The impact of remittances on household investments in children's human capital: Evidence from Morocco," Working Papers 2015-2016_4, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Sep 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:tac:wpaper:2015-2016_4
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    Cited by:

    1. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah, 2017. "Do Migrants Transfer Political and Cultural Norms to Their Origin Country? Some Evidence From Some Arab Countries," Working Papers 1098, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 2017.

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    Keywords

    Child labor; Education; Gender inequality; Remittances; Morocco;
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