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Will increase in size of landholding reduce child labour in presence of unemployment? A theoretical analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Chakraborty, Kamalika
  • Chakraborty, Bidisha

Abstract

This paper builds an overlapping generations household economy model in rural set up and examines the relationship between landholding and child labour in presence of unemployment in the manufacturing sector. We find that irrespective of whether the parents work in the agricultural sector as farmers or they work on own land, increase in size of land holding leads to decline in schooling of the child worker in the short run, and decline in growth rate of human capital formation in the long run but may lead to increase in the steady state human capital in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Chakraborty, Kamalika & Chakraborty, Bidisha, 2016. "Will increase in size of landholding reduce child labour in presence of unemployment? A theoretical analysis," MPRA Paper 74206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:74206
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/74206/1/MPRA_paper_74206.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    land holding; child labour; human capital; schooling; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment

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