IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jmacro/v30y2008i1p499-512.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Child labor participation, human capital accumulation, and economic development

Author

Listed:
  • Contreras, Salvador

Abstract

This paper presents a household theoretical model that explains child labor as a function of household resources, wages, and child work time allocation. The analysis is based on the interplay between household educational investment choices and adult-child wage differentials. The theory dynamics reveal that child labor participation is increasing in wage equality and as the wage gap decreases it reduces the distance by where the households is able to escape the cycle of poverty by investing beyond the dynamically attracting poverty level of inefficient human capital investment. The model dynamics also present the conditions by where poor households use child labor as a development strategy, as a means of accumulating physical assets at the expense of child human capital investment, in the early stages of development. The policy implications of this work are that child labor bans increase the wage differentials between child and adult earners while simultaneously decreasing the household incentive to invest in child education. The impact, of such policies, has a double negative effect on poor households. Furthermore, policies that reduce wage distortions, between adult and child labor, increase adult human capital, and provide universal access to educational will have long-run developmental growth effects. These policies, in the long-run, are shown to produce household substitution away from child labor and toward the acquisition of schooling based education.

Suggested Citation

  • Contreras, Salvador, 2008. "Child labor participation, human capital accumulation, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 499-512, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:30:y:2008:i:1:p:499-512
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0164-0704(07)00055-9
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hanushek, Eric A. & Leung, Charles Ka Yui & Yilmaz, Kuzey, 2003. "Redistribution through education and other transfer mechanisms," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(8), pages 1719-1750, November.
    2. Eric V. Edmonds & Nina Pavcnik, 2005. "Child Labor in the Global Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 199-220, Winter.
    3. Levy, Victor, 1985. "Cropping Pattern, Mechanization, Child Labor, and Fertility Behavior in a Farming Economy: Rural Egypt," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(4), pages 777-791, July.
    4. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2004. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation: Inequality and the Process of Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 1001-1026.
    5. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2005. "The Macroeconomics of Child Labor Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1492-1524, December.
    6. C. Simon Fan, 2004. "Relative wage, child labor, and human capital," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(4), pages 687-700, October.
    7. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
    8. Omer Moav, 2005. "Cheap Children and the Persistence of Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 88-110, January.
    9. Eric V. Edmonds, 2005. "Does Child Labor Decline with Improving Economic Status?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    10. Moshe Hazan & Binyamin Berdugo, 2002. "Child Labour, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 810-828, October.
    11. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-427, June.
    12. Emerson, Patrick M & Souza, Andre Portela, 2003. "Is There a Child Labor Trap? Intergenerational Persistence of Child Labor in Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, pages 375-398.
    13. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chakraborty, Kamalika & Chakraborty, Bidisha, 2016. "Will increase in size of landholding reduce child labour in presence of unemployment? A theoretical analysis," MPRA Paper 74206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kitaura, Koji, 2009. "Child labor, education aid, and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 614-620, December.
    3. Chakraborty, Bidisha & Chakraborty, Kamalika, 2016. "Low Level Equilibrium Trap, Unemployment, School Quality, Child Labour and Human Capital Formation," MPRA Paper 74621, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Éva G. Fekete, 2013. "CROSSEDU: új gazdasági képzési kurzusok a régióban," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 6-16.
    5. Iveta Korobaničová, 2013. "Marketing in Small and Medium Enterprises - A case study in Slovakia," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 82-89.
    6. Bettina Martus, 2013. "Hol van a (kor)határ? - A gyermekmunka következményei és megoldási lehetőségei," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 100-115.
    7. Eszter Siposné Nádori, 2013. "Szegénység és boldogság-érzet területi különbségei Európában és a világon," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 90-99.
    8. Laura Czifra & Aranka Mészáros, 2013. "A stafétabot átadása: avagy az újabb generációk megjelenése a munkahelyeken," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 116-122.
    9. Éva G. Fekete, 2013. "Foglalkoztatás bővítése a helyi elsődleges munkaerőpiacon," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 70-81.
    10. Ivana Hvižďáková, 2013. "National Factors of Cluster Development and Management," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 57-69.
    11. Natasa Urbančíková & Oto Hudec, 2013. "Unlocking Potential of Social Capital in the Border Regions," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 17-31.
    12. Martina Prochádzková, 2013. "Regional innovation networks from two perspectives – innovation as an essence of local development (The Case of Slovak region)," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 46-56.
    13. Moana S. Simas & Laura Golsteijn & Mark A. J. Huijbregts & Richard Wood & Edgar G. Hertwich, 2014. "The “Bad Labor” Footprint: Quantifying the Social Impacts of Globalization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-27, October.
    14. Dezső Szakály, 2013. "Technológiai háború! – Miből készülnek a modernizáció rejtett kulcsai?," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 32-45.
    15. Ádám Horváth & Melinda Mihály & Bálint Supka, 2013. "A foglalkoztatás fejlesztésének lehetőségei a Fehérgyarmati kistérségben," Eszak-magyarorszagi Strategiai Fuzetek, Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 10(2), pages 124-130.
    16. Chakraborty, Kamalika & Chakraborty, Bidisha, 2016. "Child labour ban versus Education subsidy in a model with learning by doing effect in unskilled work," MPRA Paper 74203, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:30:y:2008:i:1:p:499-512. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.