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The trade-off between child labour and human capital formation: A Tanzanian case study

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  • Hideo Akabayashi
  • George Psacharopoulos

Abstract

We investigate the degree to which there is a trade-off between child labour and human capital formation using time-log data of children from a Tanzanian household survey. We find that a tradeoff between hours of work and study exists, and hours of work tend to be more affected by social conditions than hours of study. Hours of work are negatively correlated to reading and mathematical skills through the reduction of human capital investment activities, indicating a trade-off between child labour and human capital. The results point up the complexity of the issue and the need for detailed time allocation data.

Suggested Citation

  • Hideo Akabayashi & George Psacharopoulos, 1999. "The trade-off between child labour and human capital formation: A Tanzanian case study," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 120-140.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:35:y:1999:i:5:p:120-140 DOI: 10.1080/00220389908422594
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