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Family farming, child labour and the wealth paradox: evidence from Mali

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  • Delphine Boutin

    () (Larefi (University of Bordeaux, France))

Abstract

Possession of land is often associated with higher levels of child labour. This paper will look closer at the “wealth paradox” by testing in rural Mali the relationship between landownership and one of the hidden forms of child labour, namely family-based work. We also experiment a nested logit model in relation to parental decisions processes to send children to work. Findings show that the demand for children helpers within the family increases to a certain threshold with the rise of land owned. Conversely, the larger the land size, the lower the probability for a child to work away from the family farm.

Suggested Citation

  • Delphine Boutin, 2012. "Family farming, child labour and the wealth paradox: evidence from Mali," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3471-3479.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00422
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I4-P334.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Delphine Boutin, 2014. "Climate vulnerability, communities' resilience and child labour," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 124(4), pages 625-638.
    2. Julián Arteaga Vallejo, 2016. "Land, Child Labor, and Schooling: Longitudinal evidence from Colombia and Mexico," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 014977, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    3. Chakraborty, Kamalika & Chakraborty, Bidisha, 2016. "Will increase in size of landholding reduce child labour in presence of unemployment? A theoretical analysis," MPRA Paper 74206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Bargain, Olivier & Boutin, Delphine, 2014. "Remittances and Child Labour in Africa: Evidence from Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 8007, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Bidisha Chakraborty & Kamalika Chakraborty, 2014. "Child Labour, human capital formation and size of landholding: short run and long run analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 2024-2037.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labour; Wealth paradox; rural activities; poverty; poverty hypothesis; luxury axiom; land size; child farm work; farming activities; nested logit model; Mali; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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