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Who Are Schooled in Urban Pakistan?

  • Rana Ejaz Ali Khan

    (Islamia University Bahawalpur. Pakistan)

  • Karamat Ali

    (Bahauddin Zakarya University Multan. Pakistan)

Registered author(s):

    Pakistan is severely disadvantaged by its failure to achieve higher levels of human development. Low enrolment thirty years ago is reflected in the lower educational level of today’s labor force, lower productivity and lower adaptation of technology. Even today less than half of the school-age children are going to school. Some common but many of them disputed perceptions about lower school-enrolment rate, at the household level are that the younger age children, younger in their brothers and sisters, male children, and the children from educated parents; high-income households; smaller households; wealthy households are more likely to be in school. We have analyzed these determinants for urban Pakistani children and framed some policy recommendations.

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    Paper provided by EconWPA in its series HEW with number 0505003.

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    Length: 39 pages
    Date of creation: 20 May 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0505003
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 39
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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