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Socio-Economic Determinants of School Attendance in India


  • Usha Jayachandran

    (Delhi School of Economics)


This paper investigates the socio-economic determinants of school attendance in India, and the possible causes of disadvantage faced by the girl child. Based on Census data for 1981 and 1991, the determinants of inter-district variations in school attendance are explored, separately for boys and girls. A similar analysis is applied to the gender bias in school attendance. The results indicate that school attendance is positively related to school accessibility and parental education, and negatively related to poverty and household size. Interestingly, a positive association emerges between women's labour-force participation and children's school attendance; possible explanations of this pattern are discussed. The gender bias in school attendance declines with school accessibility and parental education, and rises with household size. Panel data analysis based on the random-effects model supports the cross-section findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Usha Jayachandran, 2002. "Socio-Economic Determinants of School Attendance in India," Working papers 103, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cde:cdewps:103

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George Psacharopoulos, 1985. "Returns to Education: A Further International Update and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(4), pages 583-604.
    2. Dreze, Jean & Murthi, Mamta, 2000. "Fertility, education and development: further evidence from India," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6663, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    Cited by:

    1. SIDDIQUI, Anjum & IRAM, Uzma, 2007. "Socioeconomic Determinants Of School Progression In Pakistan," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 7(2), pages 179-192.
    2. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Karamat Ali, 2005. "Who Are Schooled in Urban Pakistan?," HEW 0505003, EconWPA.
    3. V.K. Ramachandran & Madhura Swaminathan & Vikas Rawal, 2003. "Barriers to expansion of mass literacy and primary schooling in West Bengal: Study based on primary data from selected villages," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 345, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
    4. José-Luis Alfaro Navarro & Victor-Raúl López Ruiz & Domingo Nevado Peña, 2014. "Economic Growth and Intangible Capitals: Europe versus Asia," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(3), pages 261-274, June.
    5. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Karamat Ali, 2005. "Bargaining Over Sons' and Daughters' Schooling-Probit Analysis of Household Behavior," HEW 0505002, EconWPA.
    6. Kasat, Puja, 2010. "Innovative Approaches to Developmental Microfinance in India," MPRA Paper 22238, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Toseef Azid & Rana Ejaz Ali Khan, 2010. "Who are the children going to school in Urban Punjab (Pakistan)?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(6), pages 442-465, May.
    8. Mugdha Vaidya & Meghna Katoch & Nabanita Datta Gupta, 2015. "The Impact of Household Participation in Community Based Organizations on Child Health and Education in Rural India," Economics Working Papers 2015-08, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

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    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development


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