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Bargaining Over Sons' and Daughters' Schooling-Probit Analysis of Household Behavior

  • Rana Ejaz Ali Khan

    (Islamia University Bahawalpur Pakistan)

  • Karamat Ali

    (Bahauddin Zakarya University Multan Pakistan)

No abstract is available for this item.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/hew/papers/0505/0505002.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series HEW with number 0505002.

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Date of creation: 20 May 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0505002
Note: Type of Document - pdf
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 1998. "Does the labour market explain lower female schooling in India?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 39-65.
  2. repec:van:wpaper:0212 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Cliff Attfield & Sonia R Bhalotra, 1998. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Rural Pakistan: A Semi-parametric Analysis," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers 11, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  4. Geeta G. Kingdon, 2003. "Where has all the bias gone? Detecting gender-bias in the household allocation of educational expenditure," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  5. Ranis, G. & Ramirez, A. & Stewart, F., 1997. "Economic Growth and Human Development," Papers 787, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  6. Duncan Thomas, 1994. "Like Father, like Son; Like Mother, like Daughter: Parental Resources and Child Height," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 950-988.
  7. Quisumbing, A.R., 1991. "Intergenerational Transfers in Philippine Rice Villages: Gender Differences in Traditional Inheritance Customs," Papers 632, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  8. Sawada, Yasayuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Household schooling decisions in rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2541, The World Bank.
  9. Behrman, Jere R, 1988. "Intrahousehold Allocation of Nutrients in Rural India: Are Boys Favored? Do Parents Exhibit Inequality Aversion?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(1), pages 32-54, March.
  10. Subramanian, S. & Deaton, A., 1990. "Gender Effects In Indian Consumption Patterns," Papers 147, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
  11. G. Gandhi Kingdon, 2002. "The Gender Gap in Educational Attainment in India: How Much Can Be Explained?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 25-53.
  12. Connelly, Rachel & DeGraff, Deborah S & Levison, Deborah, 1996. "Women's Employment and Child Care in Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(3), pages 619-56, April.
  13. Lokshin, Michael M. & Glinskaya, Elena & Garcia, Marito, 2000. "The effect of early childhood development programs on women's labor force participation and older children's schooling in Kenya," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2376, The World Bank.
  14. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon & Jeemol Unni, 2001. "Education and Women's Labour Market Outcomes in India," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 173-195.
  15. Usha Jayachandran, 2002. "Socio-Economic Determinants of School Attendance in India," Working papers 103, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
  16. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
  17. Akhtar Hasan Khan, 1997. "Education in Pakistan: Fifty Years of Neglect," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(4), pages 647-667.
  18. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 2002. "Consumption, health, gender and poverty," Working Papers 197, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  19. Ahmad, A. & Morduch, J., 1993. "Identifying Sex Bias in the Allocation of Household Resources: Evidence from Linked Household Surveys from Bangladesh," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1636, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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