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Returns to Education and Female Participation Nexus: Evidence from India

Author

Listed:
  • Sanghamitra Kanjilal-Bhaduri

    () (University of Calcutta)

  • Francesco Pastore

    () (University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”
    IZA (Institute of Labor Economics)
    GLO (Global Labor Organization), UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

Abstract In this paper, we aim to understand whether low labour market returns to education in India are responsible for low female work participation. The National Sample Survey Office—Employment Unemployment Survey unit level data of India for the year 2011–2012 is used to examine the relationship between educational attainment and labour market participation through gender lens. Results show that women’s education has a U-shaped relationship with paid work participation. The probability to participate in the paid labour market increases with education levels higher than compulsory secondary schooling. The labour market returns to education are insignificant and low for lower levels of education, increasing significantly along the educational levels. Technical education equivalent to degree level or above has high returns for men and women. However, women with technical education have very low levels of participation. Vocational training also provides a positive return. Our results suggest that to increase participation, women need to be educated above secondary level and receive broader technical education and more vocational training.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanghamitra Kanjilal-Bhaduri & Francesco Pastore, 2018. "Returns to Education and Female Participation Nexus: Evidence from India," The Indian Journal of Labour Economics, Springer;The Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE), vol. 61(3), pages 515-536, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijlaec:v:61:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s41027-018-0143-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s41027-018-0143-2
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    1. repec:gss:journl:v:3:y:2018:i:3:p:237-264 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Dhamija, Gaurav & Roychowdhury, Punarjit, 2018. "The impact of women's age at marriage on own and spousal labor market outcomes in India: causation or selection?," MPRA Paper 86686, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female labour force participation; Market returns to education; Development; India;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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