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Female labour force participation in India and beyond

Author

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  • Chaudhary, Ruchika.
  • Verick, Sher.

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on female labour force participation and women’s employment, with the aim of better understanding the drivers of labour market outcomes. This paper also attempts to explore the situation of women globally and in South Asia, through an examination of long-term trends of female employment. It goes further, explaining the reasons for the falling participation of women in the Indian labour market. In doing so, an econometric analysis has been carried out to understand the most important factors that may affect their probability of being in any of the various labour market outcomes, separately for the rural and urban labour markets in India. The findings reveal the importance of education, especially of post-secondary schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Chaudhary, Ruchika. & Verick, Sher., 2014. "Female labour force participation in India and beyond," ILO Working Papers 994867893402676, International Labour Organization.
  • Handle: RePEc:ilo:ilowps:994867893402676
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Humaira Husain, 2016. "Economic Development, Women Empowerment and U Shaped Labour Force Function : Time Series Evidence for Bangladesh," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(12), pages 719-728, December.
    2. Deshpande, Ashwini & Goel, Deepti & Khanna, Shantanu, 2018. "Bad Karma or Discrimination? Male–Female Wage Gaps Among Salaried Workers in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 331-344.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:102-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Huynh, Phu., 2015. "Employment, wages and working conditions in Asia's garment sector : finding new drivers of competitiveness," ILO Working Papers 994894273402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. repec:eee:wdevel:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:360-380 is not listed on IDEAS

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