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On the Role of Job Assignment in a Comparison of Education Systems

  • Katsuya Takii

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP),Osaka University)

  • Ryuichi Tanaka

    (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

This paper reexamines how differences in systems for financing education influence GDP by highlighting a neglected function of education policy: it affects the magnitude of gains from job assignment. When more productive jobs demand more skill, privately financed education can increase productivity gains from matching between jobs and skill by increasing the availability of highly educated people. This differs from the standard argument that publicly financed education increases the total amount of human capital by equalizing educational opportunities. It is shown that if job opportunities have large variations in productivity, education policy may face a serious efficiency--equity trade-off.

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Paper provided by Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University in its series OSIPP Discussion Paper with number 09E005.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:09e005
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  1. Acemoglu, Daron, 1996. "Matching, Heterogeneity and the Evolution of Income Distribution," CEPR Discussion Papers 1345, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  4. Mendes, Rute & van den Berg, Gerard J & Lindeboom, Maarten, 2007. "An empirical assessment of assortative matching in the labor market," Working Paper Series 2007:30, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
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  7. Roland Benabou, 2002. "Tax and Education Policy in a Heterogeneous-Agent Economy: What Levels of Redistribution Maximize Growth and Efficiency?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(2), pages 481-517, March.
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  11. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 1999. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Katz, L.F. & Murphy, K.M., 1991. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1580, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  13. Jovanovic, B., 1998. "Vintage Capital and Equality," Working Papers 98-16, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  14. Benabou, Roland, 1996. "Heterogeneity, Stratification, and Growth: Macroeconomic Implications of Community Structure and School Finance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 584-609, June.
  15. Katsuya Takii & Ryuichi Tanaka, 2006. "Does the Diversity of Human Capital Increase GDP? A Comparison of Education Systems," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-19, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  16. Loury, Glenn C, 1981. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Distribution of Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 843-67, June.
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  19. Jovanovic, B., 1998. "Vintage Capital and Equality," Working Papers 98-16, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  20. Katsuya Takii, 2008. "The Persistence of Differences in Productivity, Wages, Skill Mixes and Profits Between Firms in a Rapidly Changing Environment," OSIPP Discussion Paper 08E003, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
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