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On the Role of Job Assignment in a Comparison of Education Systems

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  • Katsuya Takii

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP),Osaka University)

  • Ryuichi Tanaka

    (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

Abstract

This paper reexamines how differences in systems for financing education influence GDP by highlighting a neglected function of education policy: it affects the magnitude of gains from job assignment. When more productive jobs demand more skill, privately financed education can increase productivity gains from matching between jobs and skill by increasing the availability of highly educated people. This differs from the standard argument that publicly financed education increases the total amount of human capital by equalizing educational opportunities. It is shown that if job opportunities have large variations in productivity, education policy may face a serious efficiency--equity trade-off.

Suggested Citation

  • Katsuya Takii & Ryuichi Tanaka, 2009. "On the Role of Job Assignment in a Comparison of Education Systems," OSIPP Discussion Paper 09E005, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:09e005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job assignment; Human capital; Education system;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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