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Parent’s Choice Function for Ward’s School Continuation in Rural India: A Case Study in West Bengal

Author

Listed:
  • Debdulal Thakur

    (BITS-PILANI (Goa Campus))

  • Shrabani Mukherjee

    (Madras School of Economics)

Abstract

In this paper we present a choice function of a rural household about her/his ward?s schooling. It makes an empirical evaluation on the basis of simple theoretical framework using primary data set, surveyed from two backward districts of West Bengal. It explores the underlying causes of discontinuation of school of wards by examining choice function of the parents using ordered probit analysis. The likelihood of drop out is higher in primary level towards low income category households and significantly depends on parents? attributes which are mostly endogenous in an educational production function and other exogenous difficulties in accessing school. It is also triggered up by lack of expectation about the future impact of child education on life.

Suggested Citation

  • Debdulal Thakur & Shrabani Mukherjee, 2015. "Parent’s Choice Function for Ward’s School Continuation in Rural India: A Case Study in West Bengal," Working Papers 2015-106, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
  • Handle: RePEc:mad:wpaper:2015-106
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    File URL: http://www.mse.ac.in/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Working-Paper-106.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kambhampati, Uma S. & Rajan, Raji, 2006. "Economic growth: A panacea for child labor?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 426-445, March.
    2. Peter J. Glick & David E. Sahn & Thomas F. Walker, 2016. "Household Shocks and Education Investments in Madagascar," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(6), pages 792-813, December.
    3. Ray, R., 1999. "Poverty, Household Size and Child Welfare in India," Papers 1999-01, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
    4. Basu, Kaushik & Das, Sanghamitra & Dutta, Bhaskar, 2010. "Child labor and household wealth: Theory and empirical evidence of an inverted-U," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 8-14, January.
    5. Al-Samarrai, Samer & Peasgood, Tessa, 1998. "Educational attainments and household characteristics in Tanzania," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 395-417, October.
    6. Sonia Bhalotra & Christopher Heady, 2003. "Child Farm Labor: The Wealth Paradox," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 197-227, December.
    7. Ray, Ranjan, 2000. "Child Labor, Child Schooling, and Their Interaction with Adult Labor: Empirical Evidence for Peru and Pakistan," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 347-367, May.
    8. Ingrid Robeyns, 2003. "Sen'S Capability Approach And Gender Inequality: Selecting Relevant Capabilities," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 61-92.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School Education; Dropouts; Household?s Choice; Ordered Probit Analysis; Primary Survey Data;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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