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Child labor and household land holding: Theory and empirical evidence from Zimbabwe

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Listed:
  • Ali Reza Oryoie
  • Jeffrey Alwang
  • Nicolaus Tideman

Abstract

More than 20 percent of the world’s children work. Agriculture is the largest employer of working children, and most child laborers work on farms their families own. This paper shows that the relationship between use of children as laborers and land holding is nuanced. Child labor generally decreases as per capita land holding increases, but there is a persistent upward bump in the relationship between child labor and landholding near the middle of the range of land per capita. This pattern is repeated in three surveys conducted in Zimbabwe, in 2001, 2007-8 and 2010-11. The bump can be explained theoretically by the relationship between the marginal productivity of a child worker on the farm and the marginal value placed on his/her education, at different levels of wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Reza Oryoie & Jeffrey Alwang & Nicolaus Tideman, 2016. "Child labor and household land holding: Theory and empirical evidence from Zimbabwe," Working Papers e07-51, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vpi:wpaper:e07-51
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child Labor; Land Holding; Marginal Productivity; Household Wealth;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania

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